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Echotaforge

Blacksmith, with a love for watches.

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Hi, I am a new member. My name is James, but I go by Jimmy. I am a blacksmith, with a love of pocket watches, particularly key winds. I do a little tinkering on watches in my collection from time to time. A good friend, and new member, Sterling, knowing of my interest in watches, sent me this link.

The Blacksmith Shop.jpg

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Welcome Jimmy. Does this mean that you apply your blacksmith experience/equipment on repairing/restoring pocket watches ? Would be interesting to see some of your projects.

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Thank you, all for the friendly welcome. To answer the questions brought up; no, I am not a farrier, I interpret the blacksmith trade at the High Point Museum Historical Park, in High Point, North Carolina, USA.

My smithing skills don't help much with tinkering with my watches, rather the other way around. Watchmaking has helped teach me patience.

Oldhippy, I am fascinated by the history of the blacksmith/clock maker, and their involvement in early tower clock building and repair.

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10 hours ago, Echotaforge said:

Hi, I am a new member. My name is James, but I go by Jimmy. I am a blacksmith, with a love of pocket watches, particularly key winds. I do a little tinkering on watches in my collection from time to time. A good friend, and new member, Sterling, knowing of my interest in watches, sent me this link.

The Blacksmith Shop.jpg

    welcome James;  i like that image with the anvil,   repairing a Timex ?      vin

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Hi, I am a new member. My name is James, but I go by Jimmy. I am a blacksmith, with a love of pocket watches, particularly key winds. I do a little tinkering on watches in my collection from time to time. A good friend, and new member, Sterling, knowing of my interest in watches, sent me this link.
1856653620_TheBlacksmithShop.jpg.5a0022a776dce59efcdf32e22b3e7fbb.jpg

Welcome, Jimmy. I think you will like this group. I started on pocket watches about 10 years ago. Now, it’s a full blown addiction/hobby! If you have any questions or wisdom to offer, please do. Be sure to post pictures of your project watches.


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Hello James my name is Graziano and I am new too, I play around with wrist watches mechanical of course. Gee not many blacksmiths around these days. Good luck champ

Hello Griziano, welcome. It’s a good group. I think you will like us, if you like working on, breaking or restoring watches!!


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Welcome Jimmy. Does this mean that you apply your blacksmith experience/equipment on repairing/restoring pocket watches ? Would be interesting to see some of your projects.

That would be interesting to see!! Stick that Patel in the fire for a few minutes and see how it holds up....


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Thank you, all for the friendly welcome. To answer the questions brought up; no, I am not a farrier, I interpret the blacksmith trade at the High Point Museum Historical Park, in High Point, North Carolina, USA.
My smithing skills don't help much with tinkering with my watches, rather the other way around. Watchmaking has helped teach me patience.
Oldhippy, I am fascinated by the history of the blacksmith/clock maker, and their involvement in early tower clock building and repair.

OH knows everything!


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Here in the UK the Longcase clock or as many people like to call them Grandfather clocks,  with the very old ones you come across the repairs from a blacksmith, Sorry to say they were very crude in closing worn holes due to wear, they would use a punch around the hole to try and take up the wear. That is the most common find. 

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