Jump to content
Brahma

Advice ref tools please

Recommended Posts

Hi folks.

I’m new on here - just joined yesterday.  

My main area of interest is in pocket watches and I’m hoping to develop my skills to such an extent as to be able to service and, ultimately, repair them.  I have a couple of pocket watch movements that I’m hoping to get going in the future, and I have a couple of cheaper movements that are working that I plan to strip down, clean and reassemble.  I figure my first strip down will be better done on a watch that I know is working.

I’ve been doing a fair bit of research into what tools I’ll need to start accumulating and would be interested to hear what you would recommend to be the minimum toolkit for servicing?  And then for repairing?

Also, please can you explain what and how the watchmaker’s jeweller and the watchmaker’s staking tools are used?  Are they the same?  Can they be interchanged (as in can you buy a staking tool and use it as a “jeweller” and vice versa?

Thanks all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi folks.

I’m new on here - just joined yesterday.  

My main area of interest is in pocket watches and I’m hoping to develop my skills to such an extent as to be able to service and, ultimately, repair them.  I have a couple of pocket watch movements that I’m hoping to get going in the future, and I have a couple of cheaper movements that are working that I plan to strip down, clean and reassemble.  I figure my first strip down will be better done on a watch that I know is working.

I’ve been doing a fair bit of research into what tools I’ll need to start accumulating and would be interested to hear what you would recommend to be the minimum toolkit for servicing?  And then for repairing?

Also, please can you explain what and how the watchmaker’s jeweller and the watchmaker’s staking tools are used?  Are they the same?  Can they be interchanged (as in can you buy a staking tool and use it as a “jeweller” and vice versa?

Thanks all.


I recommend getting the book "Practical Watch Repair" and all your questions will be answered. Including the need and use for 90% of watchmaking tools.

Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A staking tool is used for riveting types of operations, you whack a punch with a small hammer, and voila! You don't really want to do that when removing, inserting, or adjusting jewels. So a jeweling tool is made to smoothly push jewels, and to do that accurately.

Some staking sets have jeweling attachments that allow you to do both things,  but people often find that it is worth it to have a specialized tool for jeweling work. 

Cheers! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dadistic.

I thought that would probably be the case.  I’m just disappointed the jewelling tool and the staking tool are so expensive.  If I buy a watch and it needs a jewell replaced, I’m buggered.  Until I know I can actually repair watches, spending £300- £500 on tools is a hell of an investment for me.  Enthusiasm only goes so far doesn’t it?  I mean I used to be an enthusiastic footballer before my back injury,  but I was never good enough to play in the premier league!!!  :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin:

Not  sure what to do about this .....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do what you can within your budget, lots of people on this forum do quite a bit without a lot of expensive tools. 

It's worth investing in the basics like good screwdrivers & tweezers,  and leave the rest for the future. Most of the skills you need to learn at the start don't require the most expensive tools. For example, I still don't have a lathe, although I really should. 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do what you can within your budget, lots of people on this forum do quite a bit without a lot of expensive tools. 
It's worth investing in the basics like good screwdrivers & tweezers,  and leave the rest for the future. Most of the skills you need to learn at the start don't require the most expensive tools. For example, I still don't have a lathe, although I really should. 
Good luck!

I do very little with a lot of expensive tools.

Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi...here is my two bobs worth.

My suggestion is to try to look forward to decide what level of repairs you would anticipate doing. I understand this might vary over time though. I would suggest that at the basic level you might just be interested in servicing the watch which would require you to have a decent set of screwdrivers and tweezers, hand setting tools, cannon pinion remover - readily available from many sources. You might also need a good light, lubricants/grease and a means to wash the parts after disassembly. You could go deeper into repair with case repair which would require crystal glue, polish, and possibly silver solder tools. All of this, again is readily available and relatively inexpensive.

The next level might take you to general repair and from this level I think you might need a good staking set, anvil, small hammer to name just a few. The third level of repair might involve you actually making parts and it is this level where things get really interesting and somewhat needy. Lathes, milling and all these entail together with filing, cutting, tapping, bluing, jewel replacement, mainspring winder etc, the sky really is the limit.

I recommend you watch videos to assist you in making your first decisions, you will see the tools needed and then you can search for a preferred source according to your budget.

Another area to think of, especially if you like to buy pocket watches in need of repair could be a good source of spare parts. Think about a selection of crystals, mainsprings, spare hands, dial repair needs, spare screws, jewels, the list can just go on and on.

The good news is that you can sneak up on this hobby over time...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...