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Loren

Hello from Georgia

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I am a soon-to-be 70 year old computer programmer, retiring soon.  Enjoyed my career immensely but I'm done.  The millenials can have it now.  Though I have never even taken the back off a watch before yesterday, I think I am fascinated by the same complexity and order present inside a watch that kept me interested in my programming career all these years.  I have a newly acquired book to learn from (Maintaining and Repairing Mechanical Watches: A Practical Guide, Wiles, Mark W.) and a pocket watch (Chronometre Jupiter) I picked up while on vacation in a little shop in Naples, Italy, to start working on.  Between these and the folks on this forum I hope to learn what makes this baby tick and how to improve the accuracy of the time it keeps (right now it gains a couple hours a day).

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Welcome Loren

I am an electronics engineer and soon to retire. In the same way you describe I too find mechanical watch and clock movements fascinating so I decided to study and learn the art of service and repair.

Recently I watched a YOUTUBE video with the eminent George Daniels presiding over a meeting of the AWCI (American Watch and Clock makers Institute), where George explains in detail the creation of his co-axial escapement. Well worth a watch. He has a pleasing manner with humorous overtones. My favorite quote is where he describes the job in life of the battery of a quartz watch movement is to commit suicide at the first opportunity. You can clearly tell he is not a fan of quartz movements. Hope you enjoy the video.

Here is the link to the video. His voice is gruff, I think he may have had a sore throat.

 

 

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Thank you for the reply, Colditz.  I appreciate the link.  I actually watched a very interesting biography of his life, and the training of his apprentice, on TV last night.  Fascinating genius.  Maybe not the nicest person (arrogant, abrasive).  But clearly the grand master of watchmakers.  Imagine making those beautiful watches... EVERY single piece... with your own two hands.  Unbelievable. 

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Indeed.  That's the one.  They were an unlikely pair, I must say.  For both of them I admire the fact that it's not just about keeping time, but keeping time with elegance.  Having said that, I knew their watches would be expensive  but had no idea just how expensive.  Yikes!  :-)

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I guess its the rarity value also. Roger doesn't make many watches 10 a year I think between him and his apprentice.

Still rather have a RS watch than a Rolex any day irrespective of price. I would like to know why Roger picked the Isle of Mann to manufacture his watches and not London.

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On 12/12/2019 at 1:24 PM, Loren said:

Thank you for the reply, Colditz.  I appreciate the link.  I actually watched a very interesting biography of his life, and the training of his apprentice, on TV last night.  Fascinating genius.  Maybe not the nicest person (arrogant, abrasive).  But clearly the grand master of watchmakers.  Imagine making those beautiful watches... EVERY single piece... with your own two hands.  Unbelievable. 

He was also a racing driver

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On 12/15/2019 at 11:25 AM, yankeedog said:

Welcome...as a once upon a time electronics  tech whose  first computer  used mylar/ aluminum  punch tape,and whose "logic" was  clicking relays...welcome. 

Mine, a Prime computer at the community college I attended, all done with punch cards.  A lot of work just to get the sum of all prime numbers between 1 and 100.  :-)

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On 12/12/2019 at 10:20 AM, Colditz said:

Do you have a watch collection? If so what have you got?

Just got myself a half hunter Fusee to restore. It ticks but not for long.

 

 

I'm new to this, so my "collection" is small.  First the silver "Chronometre Jupiter" pocket watch I picked up while on vacation in Rome last month and about which I can find almost no information.  This is currently disassembled and cleaned but waiting on additional tools and supplies to be oiled and reassembled.  I have now officially spent more on tools than I did on the watch.  Apparently a well known occupational hazard for watch enthusiasts.  I have a circa 1960 Benrus wristwatch I acquired for its sentimental value.  One nearly identical was my first, gifted to me by a beloved Uncle, when I was maybe 10-11 years old.  Lastly (for now at least), another wristwatch having a Swiss hand-winding movement, identified as by Fontainemelon, which is reportedly working well. The movement is protected by an inner hinged cover which has an inscription, 'To Dick from Cecil, Xmas 1923'.  Coming to me from the Worcestershire area of the UK.  I can't help wondering who Dick and Cecil were that they made it through The Great War alive.  Possibly too young or too old to fight.  Hopefully a larger collection in the future but for now I'm enjoying my new hobby.

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My my, you will spend a small fortune on kit. I am always looking in antique shops for the odd tool that pops up now and again. In some cases they do not know what they have and you can pick up a bargain. The thing is 'patience'. I would love to get my hands on a Platax tool in good working condition at a reasonable price. Anybody got one?

The Fontainemelon is a lovely time piece - enjoy.

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6 hours ago, Loren said:

Mine, a Prime computer at the community college I attended, all done with punch cards.  A lot of work just to get the sum of all prime numbers between 1 and 100.  :-)

My most effective  "alignment " tool was a rawhide  mallet. 

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