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Kraai

How to clean dial

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A dial from a Bulle clock (model XC) looks dirty. Varnish remover does not help. Sanding and  resilvering is not possible because the letters are not engraved.

Please help, thanks, Kraai

 

Dial Bulle clock XC.JPG

Edited by Kraai

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Without messing it up you will only be able to clean it up by about 25% or so... Even that can be a tad risky, especially with the indexes, writing, numerals, etc.

It looks good as it is if you ask me. It has personality and patina. Not gonna be able to make it look brand new.

I would say that your only bet is to lightly tap the dial with some cleaning substance and some cotton and that's about it. If it'll remove some of the dirt then that'd be good enough.

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Whatever you decide to clean it with do a test somewhere that is not going to be seen. The harshest chemical I use is window cleaner and a cotton swab dabbled or rolled, never wiped


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You could try to take a picture of it and edit (removing the dirt and to make it 1 to 1) it in GIMP for example then you could use the same technique what Mark used in his video: 

 I am not sure how difficult it would be to find a spare dial to use that for the experiment and not the original one. I also like the original as it is.

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8 minutes ago, luiazazrambo said:

You could try to take a picture of it and edit (removing the dirt and to make it 1 to 1) it in GIMP for example then you could use the same technique what Mark used in his video: 

GIMP is an image transformation tool with very poor technical drawing features. One needs Illustrator, or Inkscape to work on dial blueprints.

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I've used Gimp quite a lot for flat dials, just scan the original and edit out the defects, the beauty of this you can lay the new dial over the top of the old, so if in the future you decide you want a dial restorer to work on it you have preserved it for future restoration.

You can print on off white paper or card to make the dial look aged.IMG_20190613_0002.thumb.jpg.5c53cdbaba9a4b407a94892b6dde0966.jpg1300016454_clockdial.thumb.jpg.11226ab0a0458e9e042a24b15be8e406.jpg

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Hi  K  If its not a full on restoration I should give it a wipe over with mild soap and water then leave as is It got like that through the life it lead and is therefore the character of the clock.  I personally like to leave things alone as long as its not detremental to the operation of the clock, we all pick up a few cuts and bruises through life.

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Also got me thinking, you may recall I wanted to get an Epee dial restored, but to expensive, I love what Mark did in his video, I was wondering if I could do the same, does it have to be printed with laser printer? or would normal printing be OK on the special paper??

 

Thanks Len

epee1aa.jpg

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I've used all sorts of paper a high gloss photo paper printed on a inkjet does a good job of looking like an enamel dial. I use a canon inkjet there is a setting on it that puts more ink onto the paper for the blacks, Epson heavy weight matte paper is fantastic for  non glossy printed dials it has a very fine surface finish to the paper.

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1 hour ago, wls1971 said:

I've used all sorts of paper a high gloss photo paper printed on a inkjet does a good job of looking like an enamel dial. I use a canon inkjet there is a setting on it that puts more ink onto the paper for the blacks, Epson heavy weight matte paper is fantastic for  non glossy printed dials it has a very fine surface finish to the paper.

Yes I have a Canon printer, and as you say it does a good job of the printing, I also laminate them which give a good effect. I would like to try the version that Mark uses, but if it has to be printed on the special paper with a laser printer, I will need to get printed elsewhere, which is not a problem, but would be good if it could be done on the inkjet..

Just found this on Ebay for the inkjet printer.. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Water-Slide-Decal-Paper-A4-INKJET-Waterslide-Transfer-Paper-Various-pack-sizes/254323402991?

Len

Edited by Lenj
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