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BriGuy

Timex Expedition and misc Timex watches

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Hi, I’m trying to replace the crystal on this expedition.  I have pulled the stem and the movement. The crystal was shattered. It seems to be a 29.5mm crystal with a 1mm depth. I don’t see a gasket. How would I apply the new crystal? Does it press without a gasket?

Thank you for any help provided!

Brian 

 

 

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Hi Brian and welcome to the forum where advise is given freely.  As regards your question some watches don't have gaskets but are fitted using UV cured cement/glue.  The Guru on timex on the forum is JerseyMo who is almost exclusive timex man , If he dosen't pick up the thread message him direct. ,  Esslingers web site in the USA has a tutor page for measuring and fitting watch crystals, I suggest you have a look at that before proceeding. '

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10 hours ago, BriGuy said:

I don’t see a gasket. How would I apply the new crystal? Does it press without a gasket?

As mentioned you would fit as was originally done with a clear cement (Ultra Violet curing type, or not), but you can also use a nylon gasket, with a mineral crystal IMHO that's more practical.

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