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Repair Of A Carriage Clock


Vich

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Unfortunately the boiler has gone off yesterday and we are awaiting the repair man.  I am pretty sure the diverter valve has gone but there is a slight possibility it is the pump

**BLEEP** hell Vic, that's how the clock's not working, it's steam driven!! :)

Joking aside, this is not the time of year to be without heating. :( I hope you get it sorted quickly.

It will be interesting to find out exactly what the issue is with the clock. Was it the same symptoms before you stripped it down?

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Hello Clockboy, yes, the tilt test made no difference. The clock did actually work for a while when the bust spring caught on enough to hold some coil so it could be down to me. However, as the train is working I have a good chance of sorting it out eventually.

Boiler guy just went out to get a diverted valve, the old one was stuck solid.

Cheers,

Vic

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One test I do if in doubt. Let down the mainspring then remove the escapement anchor or escape wheel re-assemble and then just give the mainspring a small wind and the wheels should spin like a good,n. If they do then you know it is without doubt the escapement that is at fault if the wheels don,t spin then its a power issue (binding gears/bent gears/ mainspring not transferring power, assembled incorrectly  etc, etc.)

Edited by clockboy
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I second what Clockboy said, after I finish a movement overhaul and it still has a problem, I push the great wheel with my finger or give one turn on the mainspring. The lack of power amplifies problem area's so they can be detected more easily.

On problem movements I re-verify the simplest operations

Do the wheels run true and not off center giving depthing problems

Do the wheels wobble sideways occasionally rubbing on another wheel intermittently, sideways shake should also be suspect

Are the bearing surfaces on barrel keeping the barrel straight and not rubbing on the plates

If the above check out, install the escapement

Does every tick and tock take the same power, does every tooth take the same amount of power

 

You get the idea, every problem is surrounded by working components that hide the problem to be easily seen..

 

Al T.

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Thanks for the advice chaps.  The train works all the way up to the escapement when you remove the anchor. Tomorrow I will have another look at the pins.  The boilers back on so I should be able to feel my finger tips.  I will put the anchor under my microscope and hopefully I will find something amiss that I can fix.  This is really quite interesting.

 

Cheers,

 

Vic

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Hello,

Well I took off the backplate,

 

post-197-0-58853900-1423160876_thumb.jpg

 

Looking at the Anchor it became obvious that both bins were both bent back

 

post-197-0-44872800-1423161074_thumb.jpg

 

I bent them in the opposite direction and they are straight now

 

post-197-0-41333200-1423161149_thumb.jpg

 

Put it back together with judicious use of rodico to keep them near the right place

 

post-197-0-09693400-1423161232_thumb.jpg

 

IMG_1024.MOV

 

Its been running for three hours now but I will leave it overnight - looks hopeful

 

All being well I will put it together at the weekend and post a final pic or two to finish off.

 

Thanks to all for the help.

 

Cheers (Bacardi, Lime and soda with lots of ice) :thumbsu:

 

Vic

 

 

 

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Great news.  The pins would have been designed to have been perfectly straight. So you should be good from now on. Another fault I have seen is the anchor shaft been bent but looking at your pics no problems. There seem no significant wear on the pins so fingers crossed you could be at the eureka moment.

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Thanks Bob,  Its a bit like the lyrics to an old tune

 

"Woke up this morning feelin fine

Got something special on my mind"

 

and when I checked it was still going strong - the clock that is.  I will finish it off on Saturday.  The only thing I have not cleaned is the Dial face which exhibits a bit of yellowing.  My in laws are both smokers so it may be down to that or just old age.  I am a bit wary, ok its slightly yellowed but I am reluctant to do anything but dust it off in case I knack it up.  It is probably in keeping and it is not disccoloured to the point where it would be classed as disfigured.

 

I am not sure that I have displayed any skill in arriving at the conclusion, it more like I stumbled along and got lucky with the encouragement and assistance of friends.  I am going to have to slow my brother in law down a bit as I dread the little boxes he presents me with.  The next thing for him is his wifes 21st birthday present, a tiny mechanical rotary watch about 10mm square circa 1975, the movement is probably even smaller.  Luckily I have my microscope.

 

Cheers,

 

Vic

 

PS lyrics from Partridge Family song - may have been David Cassidy but over here song mostly recognised as Herman's Hermits

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Just a thought.

It would be good to be able to tell someone who owns a clock how mant times to wind the key. 

 

I know this sounds simplistic and I may be  a bit naive here but based on the likelihood that most people would turn a key about half a rotation for each wind is there a formula or rule of thumb based on something like barrel size or spring size.  Or is it down to common sense ie just keep going until it "feels" tight.  I tend towards being heavy handed but with this in mind I always stop the wind well beforehand.  My sister in law however, is diminutive and yet she managed to break the spring by going too far.

In the absence of any other advice I think I will just wind the clock myself and count the turns, she may not get a full 8 days but at least it will be safe.

 

Cheers,

 

Vic

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Vic, I think the old spring had just work hardened and it was time for it to break. There absolutely no harm in counting the turns to full wind if you think that will help her.

If it is now fitted with a new spring, I don't think you or she could break it by winding even if you tried.

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Unintentional lyrics but happy they were good! Excellent job Vic. Your course of action with the dial is very sensible, those, being watches' or clocks', are delicate and you can never tell when or what will damage them...and a show of character due to normal use and age is always a plus!

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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  • 2 weeks later...

OK time to bring this to a close, got everything ready and the hard work is done so just got to do the rebuild of the case around the clock

post-197-0-18432700-1424125314_thumb.jpg

 

Put the bottom on first, two screws that double up as the fixings for the trapdoor to get to the regulator.  Note the four holes in the corners where the screws for the pillars go.

 

post-197-0-75781000-1424125564_thumb.jpg

 

Now the face just two simple screws at the 3 and 9 position on the reverse (sorry I forgot to photo)

 

post-197-0-99604200-1424125804_thumb.jpg

 

Quick look at the back

 

post-197-0-22133500-1424125987_thumb.jpg

 

Pointers on next, note the regulator is slightly towards the plus, I did not notice that originally and it had an effect.

 

post-197-0-75308100-1424126330_thumb.jpg

 

Next the panes simply push into the grooves on the pillars and the whole lot is kept together by the four screws that go into the base through the holes already shown. Then the winder and pointer adjustment knob are fitted the winder screws on anti clockwise and the knob is a friction fit.

 

post-197-0-22594300-1424126912_thumb.jpg

 

And thats it finished. The other clock is a quartz that again came from my brother in Law as it was broken but it turned out that it just needed a clean on the contacts and a new battery.

 

post-197-0-10243200-1424127001_thumb.jpg

 

When I wound the clock it started straight away so hopefully that is a good sign and I noticed within an hour that it was a bit fast so I undid the hatch and shifted the regulator slightly over to minus and I will watch it over a few days and adjust as needed.

 

Thought I would try a little video - sorry its sideways on but I got mixed up with the ipad :beerhat:

 

IMG_1048.MOV

 

And here is a preview of the next job - back to watches and slightly smaller than anything I have worked on. It may need a service as well as that pointer replaced - oh dear.

 

post-197-0-04844100-1424127610_thumb.jpg

 

Cheers and thanks to all that helped or encouraged, it was greatly appreciated.

 

Vic

Edited by Vich
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Hi Vic, that's a great result and nothing less than I've come to expect from you. :) I tried to check out your video, but I can't get it to plat on my IPad, :( I'll watch it on my PC later.

Your next project is going to test your eyesight a bit, I'm looking forward to hearing about it. :)

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  • 2 months later...

Just a last word, the two clocks are back with my brother in law along with all the watches, all working now and he was really happy to get his mums clock back in fully functioning order and it was a good experience for me, very fulfilling. I must get a pic of his grandfather clock and post it - it is massive. I will try to remember next time I go around but I usually leave his house in a somewhat somnambulant state at about 3 am by taxi.

Cheers,

Vic

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