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making my own movement holder

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Due to chronograph movement holders costing a small fortune, i am going to make my own.

A family member is taking all the measurements i need and creating an image in Solidworks. We will then print the image or get a metal version milled.

Does anybody know where i can get a the part circled in the picture? Save a bit of hassle making one.

 

Screenshot 2019-10-28 at 10.11.59.png

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Very interested in how you get on. That part could likely be replaced with a thumbscrew maybe ? To make it more realistic print a cap over it .

 

One of my projects on my printer was to do similar but NB haven't got enough time as I would like to to play around with this.

 

Please let us know how you get on.

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2 minutes ago, jnash said:

Very interested in how you get on. That part could likely be replaced with a thumbscrew maybe ? To make it more realistic print a cap over it .

 

One of my projects on my printer was to do similar but NB haven't got enough time as I would like to to play around with this.

 

Please let us know how you get on.

I did think of a thumb screw, but thought it might look a bit 'naff'. I might end up buying another movement holder and removing the knob. It would be good if i could buy something similar though

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15 minutes ago, jnash said:

Very interested in how you get on. That part could likely be replaced with a thumbscrew maybe ? To make it more realistic print a cap over it .

 

One of my projects on my printer was to do similar but NB haven't got enough time as I would like to to play around with this.

 

Please let us know how you get on.

sorry i missed the part where you mentioned the cap, could be an option thanks

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I would think getting a custom milled job from a local shop would be at least as expensive as buying the holder in the first place. A 3D printed holder would be plenty sturdy (I've printed a few and never has an issue, except where to keep them so I remember which movement they were for. ;) ) You could even 3D print the knob. It doesn't need to apply much pressure to hold the movement.

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