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Paulevs

Ronda 1113 mechanical movement

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Old movement probably been sitting idle for long time, I soak the movement in naphta   for a day or two or apply penetrating oil which  reduces risk of breaking screws . Take extra care with pin pallets. Not worth buying parts for, I got some parts to it.

 

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For a newcomer the skills you'll be needing to pick up are to do with dexterity in handling small parts with tweezers, undoing screws and making sure the screwdriver blade doesn't slip, cleaning parts, reassembly, putting the balance back in place etc. etc.

You don't want to be starting out with expensive movements and so pin-lever designs (like the Ronda 1113) are ideal as they'll introduce you to the makeup of a watch and allow you to practice the above skills and can be picked up pretty inexpensively.

Initially I'd advise getting hold of a working movement. This way you can concentrate on the important dexterity skills and disassembling and reassembling with the aim of the watch still working afterwards! The danger with picking up a non-working movement - especially on cheaper movements with limited shock protection and jewel counts  - is that the balance staff can be shot or parts worn which then means you have to get other movements the same for spares or new parts which outweigh the value of the movement.

So in summary I'd say the actual movement you chose is less important than getting something that works already and/or where there is good availability of other 'spares or repairs' movements the same so if something goes wrong you have a parts backup source.

 

Edited by WatchMaker

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8 minutes ago, WatchMaker said:

For a newcomer the skills you'll be needing to pick up are to do with dexterity in handling small parts with tweezers, undoing screws and making sure the screwdriver blade doesn't slip, cleaning parts, reassembly, putting the balance back in place etc. etc.

You don't want to be starting out with expensive movements and so pin-lever designs (like the Ronda 1113) are ideal as they'll introduce you to the makeup of a watch and allow you to practice the above skills and can be picked up pretty inexpensively.

Initially I'd advise getting hold of a working movement. This way you can concentrate on the important dexterity skills and disassembling and reassembling with the aim of the watch still working afterwards! The danger with picking up a non-working movement - especially on cheaper movements with limited shock protection and jewel counts  - is that the balance staff can be shot or parts worn which then means you have to get other movements the same for spares or new parts which outweigh the value of the movement.

So in summary I'd say the actual movement you chose is less important than getting something that works already and/or where there is good availability of other 'spares or repairs' movements the same so if something goes wrong you have a parts backup.

 

Thank you for reply. the Ronda 1113 is sold as new old stock. Working and at only £8.50. I will pick one up and practice. Thank alot. 

 

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Hi  Should be ok for practise although the calender work is a bit extra for training, as long as its a disposable movement should anthing go wrong.  I have enclosed the tech sheet for that model, might help as you re assemble the movement.  all the best

3897_Ronda RL 1013, 1113 (RL), 1213, 1313_Smaller.pdf

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For a newcomer one thing to be careful of is squeezing the tweezers too hard when holding a small part, quite often the part will 'ping' off at great speed involving much searching. Basic stuff, but you don't always think of it at the time.

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1 hour ago, fjseal said:

For a newcomer one thing to be careful of is squeezing the tweezers too hard when holding a small part, quite often the part will 'ping' off at great speed involving much searching. Basic stuff, but you don't always think of it at the time.

Thanks for all your help.i have only changed crystals,hands and whole movements before so thought I'd have a go.

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1 hour ago, fjseal said:

For a newcomer one thing to be careful of is squeezing the tweezers too hard when holding a small part, quite often the part will 'ping' off at great speed involving much searching. Basic stuff, but you don't always think of it at the time.

Therefore, see that you always have a magnetic strip around, to find the small pieces on the ground again.:biggrin:

 

https://www.toolspecialist.be/688-flexible-magnetic-strips-2-150mm-e-magnets-688?___store=be&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIopfQv7We5QIVguR3Ch34KQ4gEAQYECABEgJLvfD_BwE

 

And don't forget them to demagnetize afterwords.;)

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