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Lc130

Cleaning balance pivots

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Hi all

I’m a beginner.  I clean parts in a cheap ultrasound.  I usually suffer low amplitude.  I came across a method for cleaning balance pivots that involves scrubbing them with a jewelers rouge coated stick.  Described here https://adjustingvintagewatches.com/cleaning-balance-pivots/

is this generally a recommended cleaning step?  

Thank you

Charlie

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Balloon Chucks  I've attached a picture of the common type ones that you will find. The older style ones can have a lid that unscrews. The newer style tend to be the two that are on the bottom. The most important thing though is that when it's holding the balance and the pivot is sticking out that the Pivot is not wobbling.

Then you have a variety of things that you can use with your pivots. Sometimes referred to diamond lapping the film that's the colored strips on the left-hand side. Note there is no diamond it is aluminum oxide they come in a variety of micron finishes. Depending upon how aggressive you want to be there things like hard Arkansas stone, steel burnishers, Stone and sapphire burnishers Etc.

bc--2.JPG

bc--1.JPG

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On 10/15/2019 at 5:07 PM, Lc130 said:

After a clean and rebuild, the amplitude is about 180.  When given a puff of air the balance will swing for a few seconds and stop rather quickly.  I've tried recleaning and the jewels look ok to my untrained eye.  I did ensure that the cap jewels are not upside down.

Helpful to have the background history? What was the watch doing before you service the watch?  Then timing machine results dial up, dial down and at least one crown position crown down would be fine more would be better. Not just numeric results we need the graphical display. Then the following a proper timing machine protocol is to wind the watch fully up let it run for 15 to 30 minutes typically. Time for 30 seconds in each position and allow 30 seconds in between shifting positions to settle down. A lot of this will depend on the type of watch some will settle down faster than others.

 

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Then back to cleaning pivots and for that matter the entire watch. Maybe another solution would be purchasing proper solutions designed specifically for this. So rather than looking at the usual sources for these things I looked at Amazon and eBay. I'm giving the Amazon links of a couple below there is probably more I just didn't go looking for them. I noticed eBay had at least one of these listed below. Then fourth link PDF description of these.

So you will note with the cleaning product you need a associated rinse product. Then minor caution when you're using professional fluids that clean extremely well be careful not to leave your watch in there all day or you'll find it goes beyond cleaning and starts to etch. You can usually recognize this the solution will turn blue that's the copper that used to be in your watch plate now in solution. Worse case was a watchmaker told the story of going on vacation forgot to take the watch out the cleaner and now needed a new movement. Then unfortunately depending upon the temperature the fluid a variety of unknown conditions I wouldn't go over 10 minutes with any of the cleaning solutions I typically aim for five minutes. The rinse itself shouldn't be an issue but just to avoid any unpleasant surprises probably best not To leave your watch in any fluids for any length of time.

https://www.amazon.com/Ultrasonic-Ammoniated-Watch-Cleaning-Solution/dp/B06X9CC2RM

https://www.amazon.com/Watch-Rinsing-Solution-Chlorinated-Solvents/dp/B06WWH9Q3Z

https://www.amazon.com/Ultrasonic-Non-Ammoniated-Watch-Cleaning-Solution/dp/B01LQYMRRC

http://www.lrultrasonics.com/pdf/Jwlry.WatchSolutionsGuide.pdf

 

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Hello JohnR725,

Thank you for putting so much time and effort into your replies. All the information I was asking for is there, and then some!

I'm going to be much more brief this time.

Quote: minor nitpicky complaints - minor; OK if you see it that way. I'd prefer to say detailed. Likewise nitpicky. Complaints: no, I definitely wasn't complaining, just asking for clarification, which you very generously provided. Thanks again.

I have the 2nd edition of Fried's Watch Repairer's Manual, and my quote was taken from page 153 of that book, in the section Polishing a Dirty or Tarnished Pivot, in Part III: How to Polish a Balance Staff Pivot of Chapter IX ADJUSTING A BALANCE STAFF.

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11 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

Helpful to have the background history? What was the watch doing before you service the watch?  Then timing machine results dial up, dial down and at least one crown position crown down would be fine more would be better. Not just numeric results we need the graphical display. Then the following a proper timing machine protocol is to wind the watch fully up let it run for 15 to 30 minutes typically. Time for 30 seconds in each position and allow 30 seconds in between shifting positions to settle down. A lot of this will depend on the type of watch some will settle down faster than others.

 

Thank you!  I'm away at the moment and plan to get back into this watch later next week.

 

Charlie

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19 hours ago, Klassiker said:

Polishing a Dirty or Tarnished Pivo

Thank you it makes it much easier to find the reference if you know where it actually is in the book versus the page number. Especially when you have multiple editions of the book and things tend to shift around a little bit. Then anyone who has the third edition it's page 156

So I see is that Henry does actually use the term dirty. Then from the link above " Crusty pivots, like crusty jewels, need a thorough scrubbing ". I guess maybe I'm being overly nitpicky tarnished in my mind is not the same as crusty and scrubbing is not the same as polishing.

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I should've extracted out each section of your reply like this it might make it easier to read. Polishing in general does not change the shape I have no objection to the method only polishing usually doesn't remove crusty stuff and is a final step not the only step.
Then the reference to the Balloon chock and heavy burnishing? That is in reference to the video in the video the burnishing tool appears to be a clock pivot burnishing tool. A clock burnishing tool is in general way too aggressive on a watch pivot.
 

If this is my video you are referring to, I use watch and pocket watch balance staff burnishing tool. One half is a file and the other is scored metal, rounded on one side to follow the cone like couture of the pivot.


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