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SparkyLB

Setting Lever Screw Alteration

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I hope you'll be patient with me, as I simply saw a solution and went at it, a bit hurriedly. 

I'm at the very beginning of this hobby, and after disassembling about 5 movements (orphaned movements, bought inexpensively on eBay), I've had success with reassembling only one and getting it to tick.  I disfigured the hairspring on one, and the other 3, lost  parts to the floor.

So on this FHF 96 ST movement, I disassembled with care, cleaned all parts with naptha and rinsed in isopropyl alcohol; only to find upon reassembly I lost another part.  Despite my best attempts and using the standard compartmentalized container with plastic bell cover--the setting lever screw had gone missing. 

I took a screw from a similar movement (I bought 10 orphaned movements from eBay a couple of months ago as "parts only") with the intent of taking apart and putting back together.

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But the head was quite long, and the threaded portion not long enough.  As a result, the end sat flush with the main plate, and didn't reach the setting lever.

 

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After confirmation it was the correct thread pitch and diameter for the setting lever, I placed it in a chuck with the intention of removing some shoulder from the screwhead's bottom, so it could sit proud enough to engage the setting lever. 

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I used my lathe for the first time, and using a graver for the first time, I sloppily cut the screw.  You can see I unintentionally removed some threads close to the botom of the screwhead, but it wasn't a critical area, and there were enough threads to fully engage the setting lever. 

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The screw now sat proud enough of the main plate, to work. 

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I have a lot of practice ahead.  I'm sure my work will improve.  This was my very first project, and although it's a bit lacking in quality, from a utilitarian point of view; it worked, and will get the watch ticking. 

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On 9/28/2019 at 3:52 PM, SparkyLB said:

Despite my best attempts and using the standard compartmentalized container with plastic bell cover--the setting lever screw had gone missing.

One thing you can do to minimize risk of losing parts is to not wash screws when it's evident they are clean. Just drop them in the right compartment. I know that will horrify some people but it's not them that will find parts for you that got lost during unnecessary manipulation.
Beside that, good work with the lathe and all.

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Thank you for that information.  I certainly appreciate the constructive criticism and words of encouragement.  I don't clean screws or springs.  I have to get into the habit of tightening up my "chain of custody" practices.  I know how I dropped parts without knowing.  I previously performed the practice of putting things down, blindly.  That practice will now stop.

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Losing parts is standard practice when beginning, sure many will agree. I have never washed screws, but would if really bad. Worst is the pinging the part across the room! Want to get a lathe myself, hoping someone i know will get rid of his cheap. 

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1 hour ago, stevew said:

Losing parts is standard practice when beginning, sure many will agree. I have never washed screws, but would if really bad. Worst is the pinging the part across the room! Want to get a lathe myself, hoping someone i know will get rid of his cheap. 

Yes, pinging parts is exasperating.  I remember Marc Lovick saying in a video  (and I paraphrase) "try to disassemble and reassemble a movement without using your fingers.  Use your tweezers as much as possible, and get used to the correct pressure involved with picking up and holding onto parts."  That's about where I am.  I'm developing the habit of picking up, and hovering for a moment or two before lifting to confirm I have a good purchase on the part.  I lost a crown wheel ring by picking it up from the outside, when it would have been more prudent to pick it up with the tweezers as close together as possible. 

I'm learning, and very much enjoying this.  I'm confident there will come a day when dropping and losing parts will be the exception, and not the rule.  

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The most effective way to not loose parts is about your bench. You need it large, uncluttered, nice smooth light finish with raised edges and you have to sit do that it's at shoulder lever. The plus is having inclined arm rests. And work far from the edge for as much is possible. 

You must have at least some of the above. That will make you be comfortable and relaxed, physically and mentally. When something slips it won't go far and you will see it right away. 

You need to prevent pinging at any cost. First, identify the parts which will ping and how they will. Don't remove anything under which holds a potentially pinging part before having studied what comes next with diagrams or videos. Always work with a stick or Rodico in the left hand. Of course the safest way is to work in a bag. 

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