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Vladimir

Rotary Skeleton Movement Disassembling

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Hi Guys, 

Hope this finds all well, i have started disassembling a rotary watch with a skeleton movement and a tiny part fell out of the movement which i was not in time to take a picture. If anyone has ever worked on similar movement and know where it belongs i will appreciate your help.

Pictures attached.

Thank you in advance. 

Vladimir.

 

IMG_20190917_204048.jpg

IMG_20190917_204256.jpg

IMG_20190917_204324.jpg

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Those pawl levers (aka Magic Levers) translates the movement of the rotor in any direction to an anticlockwise movement on the second reduction wheel (the wheel with the left-handed screw) Then it is transfered to the rachet wheel and then to the main spring.

The click is between the rachet wheel (golden coloured wheel in the AndyHull photo) and the barrel below it, and I think this click could be the part you found.

But, if it is the click, where is the screw that was holding it in place? And the rest of the click?

With the 2nd reduction wheel removed, you can test if there is a working click by trying to wind the movement via the rachet wheel screw and see it the MS holds the tension.

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That looks suspiciously  like a PTS Hangzhou, one of the most common Chinese skeletonized movements.

image.png.4c4369d4c4a07d211c044bab4852ef63.png

Something like the one above. You may find some info here ->

http://www.ptsresources.com/watch_handwinding_01.htm

and here ->

https://www.rwg.bz/board/index.php?/topic/808-chinese-watch-movement-information/

If you can identify the exact caliber, then you may be able to track down a datasheet, or perhaps a tear down video.

They are in my opinion, reasonable quality, so worth repairing.

Edited by AndyHull

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Hi  Once again Andy is on the mark, The chinese produce quite a few skeleton movements, which one this is, we really need the calibre to be able to identify the bit. I doe's look as though it was at some time screwed down, the screw may yet be lodged in the works some where.

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4 hours ago, AndyHull said:

The "small part" looks most likely to be from the keyless work, and looks to have been held in place by a screw.
Is the movement an automatic or manual wind?

Hi AndyHull,

It is an automatic movement.

Thanks.

Vladimir.

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56 minutes ago, watchweasol said:

Hi further research turns up rotary using the Hangzhou HZ2189 movement but also they used seagull movements of which there are a lot of both makes on the market. Will continue to look

Hi watchweasol,

Thanks a lot for you dedication,  it seems that is the right movement reference. I could establish that the same movement is used in some Shurling Watches (Alpine model).

thank you all for your patience.

Regards,

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5 hours ago, AndyHull said:

The "small part" looks most likely to be from the keyless work, and looks to have been held in place by a screw.
Is the movement an automatic or manual wind?

 Hi AndyHull,

it is automatic...

thanks...

Regards,

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That part number -  CH2189W - seems to turn up quite a lot of info too. 

It is not uncommon for the same, or similar movements to be listed with different part numbers by different suppliers, and for the same or similar Chinese movements to be produced by more than one manufacturer.

Edited by AndyHull

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Could it be a (broken) click? It's similar to the Seiko click designs in some movements like 6119, and now that AndyHull has shown the movement there are quite a few parts that are also like the Seiko, for example the second reduction wheel and the pawl levers on the automatic mechanism. And I can see the click is also Seiko style.

EDIT: This is a Seiko 6119 click

click.jpg

Edited by aac58

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6 hours ago, AndyHull said:

This link might also help

http://www.startimesupply.com/product/CH2189W.html

 

CH-2189.jpg

I think it is the same movement, or at least one that is closely related, and there is a partial picture of the keyless work.

Hi AndyHull,

this picture and aac58 comments helped in identifying where that part goes,  i have attached an image with the highlighted area.

thanks a million...

 

CH-2189.jpg

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1 hour ago, aac58 said:

Those pawl levers (aka Magic Levers) translates the movement of the rotor in any direction to an anticlockwise movement on the second reduction wheel (the wheel with the left-handed screw) Then it is transfered to the rachet wheel and then to the main spring.

The click is between the rachet wheel (golden coloured wheel in the AndyHull photo) and the barrel below it, and I think this click could be the part you found.

 But, if it is the click, where is the screw that was holding it in place? And the rest of the click?

With the 2nd reduction wheel removed, you can test if there is a working click by trying to wind the movement via the rachet wheel screw and see it the MS holds the tension.

Hi aac58,

thank you so much for the detailed explanation... it helped a lot locating where it goes..

Regards,

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