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Sharpening pegwood etc.

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I'm looking for tips on how to get a really sharp point on pegwood etc. I've tried a pencil sharpener, which just puts a long, thin tip on the wood, without bringing it to a point. I've also tried a scalpel, but I don't like the facets and edges leading up to the point. I want it nice and round if possible. I know it's possible. I even saw a perfect example in a post I read recently (poss. from Nickelsilver). So what do others do? Use a file, or abrasive paper? I tried this too, but I still never got a point sharp enough to clean jewel holes for example.

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I've used cocktail sticks, or rather toothpicks, which are "free" from the works canteen. They work fine for general cleaning and manipulating small parts. They are not sharp enough for pegging jewels though.

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I use a cutter knife, the kind with replaceable blades that break off in like 10 little sections. Facets are good!- they help clean. If you're doing jewel holes you need to resharpen after each one, you'll get quick fast. I use a loupe. I also do a lot of small watches with 0.07mm jewel holes...

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33 minutes ago, nickelsilver said:

I use a cutter knife, the kind with replaceable blades that break off in like 10 little sections. Facets are good!- they help clean. If you're doing jewel holes you need to resharpen after each one, you'll get quick fast. I use a loupe. I also do a lot of small watches with 0.07mm jewel holes...

 

2 hours ago, oldhippy said:

I just used a sharp pen knife. I also used cocktail sticks.

OK, seems like  the experts use knives. Do you actually cut, or scrape? What kind of angle are you trying for at the tip? Do you need to clean the dust, fibres or flakes away after sharpening, and if so, how?

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I use both "cocktail sticks" (got to love the British sense of propriety) and peg wood.  Use a disposable scalpel and "whittle" the point.  When I'm getting close to a point, I simply cut less and less by reducing the angle of the blade to the stick.  Use your magnification to look at your work.  And yes, repeat the pointing exercise between each jewel unless you move to one with a bigger central hole.

 

Good Luck,


RMD

Edited by rduckwor
typos

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For general just pushing and holding I cut a steeper angle maybe 30 degrees, for fine pegging of jewels a shallower angle of 15-20 degrees. Cut, not scrape. I find that pegwood is faaaaar better for fine work than toothpics or bamboo skewers or whatever. For clocks I do use lots of toothpics.

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Like others I just use a knife.

I have a small quality 2 bladed Barlow pocket knife I've had for so long I don't even remember how I got it.

I have the small blade sharpened nicely and just use that.

I try to keep it evenly sharpened on all sides, but as said above facets are good, they help remove any dirt.

I have a large amount of pegwood of many sizes so I have never used anything but pegwood, so cant tell you if it is better than kebab sticks or toothpicks, or any of the other alternatives, but pegwood is cheap and lasts ages so I see no need to try something cheaper.

Tony

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