Jump to content
  • 0
ITProDad

Help with hair springs

Question

I need to learn how to identify different types of hairsprings.  I can work with them, reshape, remove from the staff etc.  what I can’t seem to figure out is...

1. How to tell the difference between hairsprings: size, strength or the proper terms to describe what I’m looking at and may need to order.

2.  Where to order a new one.

i have looked on J Boral, essinger, Casker, Cousins and Perrin.  I can’t seem to find a place to buy replacement springs or balance complete.  Well, I did find balance complete on Cousins.  But I don’t know the difference between “ordinary” or extraordinary... much less decipher which one I may need.

 

i need to learn about hairspring identification, classification and more.

 

any suggested books, videos, reference or Devine enlightenment?

thank you, team!

Edited by ITProDad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

I think your best bet is to google types of different watch hairsprings. You will find pages of information with good diagrams. You are right it is a minefield. This is the first page that came up with google.

https://monochrome-watches.com/technical-perspective-hairspring-technology-manufacturing-process-developments/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

The tricky thing with hairsprings is that nobody supplies them as spare parts. There may be some old stock laying around here and there, they come up regularly on Ebay.

 

As for classification, there are several materials. Steel, beryllium, and Nivarox (alloy springs, that would include Elinvar). The beryllium and alloy springs are to be used with monometallic uncut balances, and steel with bimetallic cut balances. They are graded by CGS number, which basically goes from small, like 0.05 for the tiniest movement, up to 25 or so for a large pocket or deck watch. To find out which CGS you need, you need a spring that just looks kind of right, which you vibrate to the balance, and then take measurements and compare that to the final diameter of spring you desire. This is a matter of movement design, but does sort of follow a pattern.

 

Bottom line is you need a lot of springs on hand to do any real hairspring work, which means buying up as many as you can find for years.

 

Here's a thread from a while back with some good info:

 

Edited by nickelsilver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
8 hours ago, ITProDad said:

Well, I did find balance complete on Cousins.  But I don’t know the difference between “ordinary” or extraordinary... much less decipher which one I may need.

Balance is the main area where the Swiss made diversification and grading of a same mov't. Before shock-proof became universal the base version was the ordinary, shock-proof was one step up. Another variance could be the rim, smooth  -"annulaire" or with poising stubs or screws -"a vis". Then the material used as explained by Master nickelsiver. In some cases, the option was a Breguet hairsping and free sprung balances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...