Jump to content

New Video - Vintage Omega 30T2 (1940's Military Watch) With Broken Impulse Jewel


Recommended Posts

Just uploaded a new video. This one is one of my favourites, an Omega Military watch from the mid to late 40s. It had a broken balance staff, impulse jewel and the pivot on the centre wheel had a groove worn into it.

 

I didn't film the lathe work but managed to get quite a bit under the camera.

 

I hope it's useful to someone.

 

post-1-0-79536100-1419079855_thumb.jpg

 

Some pics:

 

post-1-0-95293900-1419082175_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-49698100-1419082176_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-00010600-1419082177_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-41873600-1419082177_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-89665500-1419082177_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-48697200-1419082178_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-97044800-1419082178_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-43095000-1419082179_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-99983600-1419082179_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-43249100-1419082180_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-12062600-1419082206_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-69137300-1419082206_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-19307200-1419082207_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-66042400-1419082207_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-23566900-1419082208_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-66467600-1419082208_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-06066800-1419082209_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-41001900-1419082209_thumb.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another fine video with an excellent lesson on replacing the impulse pin. Thanks.

A question: when starting from a broken-off pin how do you judge the initial position of the new jewel with respect to the roller? Is that just experience or is  there a rule?

Link to post
Share on other sites

The jewel cannot foul the guard pin on the pallets. And the crescent notched into the roller is for the guard pin to pass. So, naturally, the bottom of the jewel must be above the crescent.

Hope that makes sense.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark,

 

I believe this is one of the best videos ever concerning the quality and nearness of the takes! The contents is unbelievable just like the other ones, this simply highlights it with amazing quality. I learned a lot from it continuing a learning curve only made possible by your excellent videos and forum.

 

May I ask, the plate you use to heat the Shellac -- which has appeared before in your videos -- is it something of your own manufacture or is it available for sale elsewhere? Since I got my staking tools I've been collecting all sort of goodies to work on (just waiting for a good time and some jewels) and foresee doing some of the same Shellac/heat thing you so masterly do on your videos.

 

Thank you for the info in advance and many more thanks for the excellent Christmas gift that this video represents to us. Your labor of love is deeply appreciated.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark,

 

I enjoyed your video so much! Thank you for posting it and provide us with one more excellent learning experience! These pictures are a nice complement to the video.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

The plate Mark is using is I suspect what I use which is an old Clock movement plate. Another point worth noting is I attended a presentation by a guy who repairs and services watches for a living at a Kent BHI. During the meeting it was asked if you can not purchase  a replacement pivot that is scored on say a Rolex what is the alternative. The guy said it is quite acceptable to remove the score from the pivot on a lathe & re-jewel with a jewel that has a smaller internal hole. Exactly as Mark does in this excellent vid.

Edited by clockboy
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys.

 

The brass plate is made by myself - just a rough job from some brass sheeting.

 

The holes are useful for blueing screws. The channel slot is useful for tempering newly made stems after hardening.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Mark, I appreciate the information. Do you recommend specific dimensions and type/thickness of brass sheeting or you just go by the spur (needs) of the moment, so the holes and other features are added accordingly?

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally got some time to watch Marks latest horological production. As usual a quality production that I enjoyed immensely. The more I learn, the more I wish I had been involved with horology years ago. At least now being retired, I can devote a lot more time to it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Mark, I appreciate the information. Do you recommend specific dimensions and type/thickness of brass sheeting or you just go by the spur (needs) of the moment, so the holes and other features are added accordingly?

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

 

It was just a scrap piece of brass lying around, drilled a few holes and filed a channel :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

... and I believe you are using a new microphone too  .... make you sound very debonair :)

 

Cheers mate - was hoping to attract some female viewers with my debonair voice. So far it's not working :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

What a genuine privilege it is to be able to watch such skilled work take place. Thank you Mark for sharing your talent with us! 

 

I'm sure the debonair voice will bring the lady watch groupies out of hiding. You should have no trouble cornering that market  :rock:

Link to post
Share on other sites


  • Similar Content

    • By Rafael
      Hello,
      Anyone here have an experience with a similar vintage Omega and knows how to remove the movement from the case? Tried rotating the movement (slightly, i'm afraid i'll break something) but with no luck.
      Thanks!


    • By Cmmb8519
      Hi all
      It has been a great challenge to find a Omega Case tube for my Seamaster Chronograph Professional case 178.0504 (or 178.0514).
      Omega part number is 090ST1237.
      Any place I can buy an alternative after market to replace the original? any suggestion on where you would go for an Omega like after market case tube?
      It is quite a long tube (5.90mm) threaded in the inside.
      Many thanks
    • By Linz
      Hello all,
      I know it's 'only' an electrical one but to say I'm overjoyed is a bit of an understatement.
      My Grandfather gave me this, his 1982 retirement watch, 20 years ago as an empty case and strap - the innards had apperently been slowly demolished over the years by a leaky battery and where nowhere to be found.
      At the start of the locky-down thing I decided it was time to do a bit of research to see if the parts could be found to rebuild it, bit of a baptism of fire as a total newby. It soon became evident that this search should have been done years ago because Omega restricted parts coupled with a dearth of NOS parts was a real headache! 
      Through all this research I also realised just how rare the case and bracelet style were so persisted for months, getting my claws on some old, rough, nasty and for want of a better word, crap bits and pieces. As we know the circuit and coil are getting really rare but even more rare it seems are the winding pinions and dials for them, and even the crap parts are ludicrously expensive. You know how you get into something, buy bits, realise your up to your neck in it but realise you're to far in it to retreat?
      Suffice to say, I've had so much support from several people in the watchmaker community so with their help and shear dogged, billigerence and blatant stubbornness it is finally running. Still some work to do -  the date needs to start changing at half 11 because it takes two hours to change, the seconds hand needs lining up better with the minute markers and I've toyed with the idea of restoring the dial, with some lacquer and minute markers missing (or maybe not, as it's a sign of its individuality!) 
      Having enjoyed it for a while I'll also take it all apart again and service it, only because of Lawson''s brilliant walk-through on the 1337 movement on this forum. 
      Never really thought of a bi-colour watch like this as my style, but with the blood, sweat, tears and more sweat and tears that has gone into it, I've decided I love it to bits. Thank you all for your never ending inspiration and such generous shared knowledge Mark Lovick and everyone - great bunch of people you lot!


    • By daveincarthage
      Got a ladies Omega De Ville in an auction lot today. My limit for repairs to this point has been installing batteries. The watch runs but runs several hours fast. 
      I know there are a few reasons it could be running fast. I don't have a degausser but suspect it could be magnetized. 
      What are some other things I should consider or questions I should ask if I take it in for repair?
      Also, do you know if there was originally a plastic retaining ring to secure the movement in the case? There was none when I opened the back.
       
      Thanks in advance!
       
       

    • By jakobvinkas
      Hello!
      Not sure if this is the right place for my question since I do not intend to do the repair myself. However I am wondering if anyone knows an approximate price of a tachymeter for the Omega 3520.50 day-date (tripple date).
      If anyone has any idea what a insert and the "repair" would cost at a watch shop, please let me know.
      Thanks in advance.
      Jakob

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Apologies for being uncouth- I've not put in enough effort in the community lately due to a relocation, health issues, children schooling from home, and just the general "2020 malaise" but I've got another beauty in hand that I'd like to share. This is a Jardur Bezelmeter (model 960), probably from around 1945, which I picked up from eBay this week.  It cost a pretty penny too but it's a piece that's been on my wishlist for a long time and this particular one ticked all the boxes. The Bezelmeter has an interesting history- from what I have read it was marketed primarily to aviators and military personal during the 1940's and according to legend was commonly sold through military post exchanges. Collectors seem to believe that the watches often served active service members. Advertisements from the period make it clear they were marketed as tool for the adventurous professional. Introduced more than a decade before the Navitimer and Breguet Type 20, it was certainly a watch ahead of it's time. It's quite a large watch at 38mm and exhibits all of those traits we usually associate with a Pilot Watch- luminous hands, blackened dial, tachymetre scale, and of course the chronograph function.  Specialty features include the countdown bezel and 180 degree scale on the dial (useful to pilots executing a standard rate of turn). The movement is shock protected, the case is stainless steel and water resistant with a screw down caseback and cork seals; all fairly unusual features for a watch of this age. All the Bezelmeters I've seen house either a Valjoux 71 or 72 movement inside.  I prefer the former as the earlier Valjoux 71 Bezelmeters had slightly larger cases and sported the more elegant cathedral hands. The movement in my Bezelmeter needs a service (naturally) as it only runs for a few seconds. I can't wait to get to it but unfortunately I've already got a line of other watches to clear out first.  
    • welcome aboard! pretty new too. some cool people and lots of knowledge. enjoy.
    • ever contemplate these? www.esslinger.com/bergeon-7026-watch-hands-installing-tweezer 45 bucks at Esslinger, 41 bucks at Ofrei. Horotecs version is astronomical! again, I'm still deciding if I'm more comfortable with the hand tools or the cheapo hand press. I like that the press keeps things perpendicular. That seems to be key for me. between Rodico and these tweezers tho, they have helped. another thing I use is a tiny bit of rodico attached to the end of the tool tip that holds the hand. I get it to the pinion to get it started. pause, remove the bit of rodico then continue the install.  so many different things-still trying to find a consistent trick. I'm all over the board. 
    • Keeping with the spirit of this community, I'm not going to discuss any business stuff here. I've shared my photos and notes 'cause I hope they inspire someone else to try to do something cool and creative with watches, and I hope my progress notes will help.
×
×
  • Create New...