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    • By Linz
      Hello all,
      I know it's 'only' an electrical one but to say I'm overjoyed is a bit of an understatement.
      My Grandfather gave me this, his 1982 retirement watch, 20 years ago as an empty case and strap - the innards had apperently been slowly demolished over the years by a leaky battery and where nowhere to be found.
      At the start of the locky-down thing I decided it was time to do a bit of research to see if the parts could be found to rebuild it, bit of a baptism of fire as a total newby. It soon became evident that this search should have been done years ago because Omega restricted parts coupled with a dearth of NOS parts was a real headache! 
      Through all this research I also realised just how rare the case and bracelet style were so persisted for months, getting my claws on some old, rough, nasty and for want of a better word, crap bits and pieces. As we know the circuit and coil are getting really rare but even more rare it seems are the winding pinions and dials for them, and even the crap parts are ludicrously expensive. You know how you get into something, buy bits, realise your up to your neck in it but realise you're to far in it to retreat?
      Suffice to say, I've had so much support from several people in the watchmaker community so with their help and shear dogged, billigerence and blatant stubbornness it is finally running. Still some work to do -  the date needs to start changing at half 11 because it takes two hours to change, the seconds hand needs lining up better with the minute markers and I've toyed with the idea of restoring the dial, with some lacquer and minute markers missing (or maybe not, as it's a sign of its individuality!) 
      Having enjoyed it for a while I'll also take it all apart again and service it, only because of Lawson''s brilliant walk-through on the 1337 movement on this forum. 
      Never really thought of a bi-colour watch like this as my style, but with the blood, sweat, tears and more sweat and tears that has gone into it, I've decided I love it to bits. Thank you all for your never ending inspiration and such generous shared knowledge Mark Lovick and everyone - great bunch of people you lot!


    • By daveincarthage
      Got a ladies Omega De Ville in an auction lot today. My limit for repairs to this point has been installing batteries. The watch runs but runs several hours fast. 
      I know there are a few reasons it could be running fast. I don't have a degausser but suspect it could be magnetized. 
      What are some other things I should consider or questions I should ask if I take it in for repair?
      Also, do you know if there was originally a plastic retaining ring to secure the movement in the case? There was none when I opened the back.
       
      Thanks in advance!
       
       

    • By jakobvinkas
      Hello!
      Not sure if this is the right place for my question since I do not intend to do the repair myself. However I am wondering if anyone knows an approximate price of a tachymeter for the Omega 3520.50 day-date (tripple date).
      If anyone has any idea what a insert and the "repair" would cost at a watch shop, please let me know.
      Thanks in advance.
      Jakob

    • By east3rn
      Hello. 
      I am about to work on a Omega ladies automatic watch.
      I found out that the axis of the rotor is out of place and shakes up and down.
      What could be done in this situation?
      Thanks!

    • By DouglasSkinner
      I have an old Waltham pocket watch movement which is missing the impulse pin (roller jewel).  I have a limited number of actual jewels and since this is just a practice movement I thought I'd try to make one out of brass.  I've seen this several times in old pieces--usually a very sloppy job.  So I got some brass stock of the same diameter as the "D" in the roller table, filed it and burnished it to a high gloss.  Then I took a small, very fine diamond file and filed it half flat to form the "D"  I then polished the face using progressively finer sandpaper on a steel block.  This works fine--so far!  Problem is separation of the piece from the stock.  Again I used a small cutting file to do this but it doesn't leave the end very pretty.  So what I've done so far is to fit the good end into the roller table.  I then plan to shellac it in place and see if I can very carefully adjust the length and clean up the end.  Has anyone done this before?  Any suggestions as to how best to do it?  
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