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Mark

New Video - Vintage Omega 30T2 (1940's Military Watch) With Broken Impulse Jewel

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Just uploaded a new video. This one is one of my favourites, an Omega Military watch from the mid to late 40s. It had a broken balance staff, impulse jewel and the pivot on the centre wheel had a groove worn into it.

 

I didn't film the lathe work but managed to get quite a bit under the camera.

 

I hope it's useful to someone.

 

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Some pics:

 

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Another fine video with an excellent lesson on replacing the impulse pin. Thanks.

A question: when starting from a broken-off pin how do you judge the initial position of the new jewel with respect to the roller? Is that just experience or is  there a rule?

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The jewel cannot foul the guard pin on the pallets. And the crescent notched into the roller is for the guard pin to pass. So, naturally, the bottom of the jewel must be above the crescent.

Hope that makes sense.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Hi Mark,

 

I believe this is one of the best videos ever concerning the quality and nearness of the takes! The contents is unbelievable just like the other ones, this simply highlights it with amazing quality. I learned a lot from it continuing a learning curve only made possible by your excellent videos and forum.

 

May I ask, the plate you use to heat the Shellac -- which has appeared before in your videos -- is it something of your own manufacture or is it available for sale elsewhere? Since I got my staking tools I've been collecting all sort of goodies to work on (just waiting for a good time and some jewels) and foresee doing some of the same Shellac/heat thing you so masterly do on your videos.

 

Thank you for the info in advance and many more thanks for the excellent Christmas gift that this video represents to us. Your labor of love is deeply appreciated.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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Hi Mark,

 

I enjoyed your video so much! Thank you for posting it and provide us with one more excellent learning experience! These pictures are a nice complement to the video.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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The plate Mark is using is I suspect what I use which is an old Clock movement plate. Another point worth noting is I attended a presentation by a guy who repairs and services watches for a living at a Kent BHI. During the meeting it was asked if you can not purchase  a replacement pivot that is scored on say a Rolex what is the alternative. The guy said it is quite acceptable to remove the score from the pivot on a lathe & re-jewel with a jewel that has a smaller internal hole. Exactly as Mark does in this excellent vid.

Edited by clockboy

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Thanks guys.

 

The brass plate is made by myself - just a rough job from some brass sheeting.

 

The holes are useful for blueing screws. The channel slot is useful for tempering newly made stems after hardening.

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Thank you Mark, I appreciate the information. Do you recommend specific dimensions and type/thickness of brass sheeting or you just go by the spur (needs) of the moment, so the holes and other features are added accordingly?

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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As always a first class video by a master at watch repairing and video making.  I always enjoy watching a master at work be it Mark with his shellac and diamond file or Will with his guitar.   :bow: 

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I finally got some time to watch Marks latest horological production. As usual a quality production that I enjoyed immensely. The more I learn, the more I wish I had been involved with horology years ago. At least now being retired, I can devote a lot more time to it.

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Thank you Mark, I appreciate the information. Do you recommend specific dimensions and type/thickness of brass sheeting or you just go by the spur (needs) of the moment, so the holes and other features are added accordingly?

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

 

It was just a scrap piece of brass lying around, drilled a few holes and filed a channel :D

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... and I believe you are using a new microphone too  .... make you sound very debonair :)

 

Cheers mate - was hoping to attract some female viewers with my debonair voice. So far it's not working :D

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What a genuine privilege it is to be able to watch such skilled work take place. Thank you Mark for sharing your talent with us! 

 

I'm sure the debonair voice will bring the lady watch groupies out of hiding. You should have no trouble cornering that market  :rock:

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