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DoctoralHermit

What did I do wrong with these keyless works?

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Hello again! from the Mockba bench! For those of you who haven't seen my previous posts, this is a 1950s Mockba watch made in the First Moscow Watch Factory. It's my first build, and I'm really excited that I've made it this far, but the keyless works appear to be an impasse. I would greatly appreciate your help!

I've assembled the keyless works, as seen in the attached pictures, but I cannot push the crown or pull it out at all.

 

Here's some details on what I did to assemble the keyless works:

 

1. Pushed in the crown all the way

2. Put the clutch lever in the groove of the clutch

3. Pushed the clutch outwards as far as it can, which also moved the clutch lever and the set lever

4. Wedged the lever spring against the clutch lever so it stores potential energy

5. Screwed down the cover plate, ensuring that the little peg sticking down from the arm of the cover plate is pressed against one of the notches (which I assume is for this purpose) of the set lever

 

Any idea why the whole thing seems to be firmly affixed, but so much that the crown cannot be pulled out at all? Thank you!

M2JVJiNMScK+UQidZKC+UA_thumb_13f9.jpg

+s+BvVe0TtadcaWRVeavqw_thumb_13fa.jpg

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I haven't worked with this  ROEDA Watch movement but I Think you have to lift the detent spring to the other side of the pin on the setting lever.
I assume there also is somekind of spring too underneath the setting bridge which pushes on the yoke forward.

POBEDA.png

Edited by HSL

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52 minutes ago, HSL said:

I haven't worked with this  ROEDA Watch movement but I Think you have to lift the detent spring to the other side of the pin on the setting lever.
I assume there also is somekind of spring too underneath the setting bridge which pushes on the yoke forward. 

POBEDA.png

Yes, there is a spring that is pushing on the yoke lever, and I believe it has been placed properly.

 

I'm sorry, I didn't quite understand the part about the pin and the setting lever. Does this mean I have to screw down the cover plate when the crown is pulled out, so that the setting lever is in a different position?

Edited by DoctoralHermit

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I suggest making a habbit of taking pictures at each stage of strip down, for possible use during assembly, furthermore, posting such pictures in gallary goes to create a valuable data base of the kind. 

 

 

 

 

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I don’t see any sign of any oil or grease. It just might be its hard to set because of lack of lube. One other thing, check you have screwed in the correct length screws, if you have put in the wrong screw it could be fouling the setting lever. Have you oiled the cannon pinion? if not you might strip the teeth of the wheels when it comes to setting the hands.  

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I really wasn't sure what to lubricate, so I lubricated the crown a bit, along with the point where each wheel contacts the pivot. Are there other places I should lubricate?

Also, to be more specific, I'm unable to pull the crown out at all, it's not necessarily winding that is the issue. Could this be affected by a lack of lubrication as well?

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13 hours ago, oldhippy said:

I don’t see any sign of any oil or grease. It just might be its hard to set because of lack of lube. One other thing, check you have screwed in the correct length screws, if you have put in the wrong screw it could be fouling the setting lever. Have you oiled the cannon pinion? if not you might strip the teeth of the wheels when it comes to setting the hands.  

Also, I am quite certain that I have put in the correct length screws... I recorded screw length on disassembly. The one that goes through the eyelet on the setting lever is a distinct screw, as I believe it's the screw that you use to release the crown from the movement.

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