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Bezel paint reapply on a Breitling chronospace


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Hey guys, my name is Lorenz. I am an 18 year old electrical engineering student from Germany. 

I got this Breitling chronospace a56012.1 from my granddad and I want to repair it.

Besides a slight clicking noise while turning the crown ( someone please let me know if this is normal ) it works just fine.

My main problem is that the black color on the Bezel is worn out on some positions and I dont know where to find a paint that holds on the metal nor do I know how to paint it again.

I have worked with watches already, I disassembled a mechanical movement cleaned and oiled it again so I feel pretty confident in doing this job.

And I would also like to change out the crystal, does anyone know what size crystal I need for this watch?

Thanks in regards for any advice.

IMG_20190808_225348.jpg

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Lovely watch, I used to have one as well.  As for paint, I suspect enamel, probably for models, slightly thinned with thinner and a piece of very sharp peg wood.  I would carefully clean the area to be painted with solvent and allow it to flash off before trying to apply paint.  Otherwise, the paint may not adhere due to skin oils, etc.  As for crystal, no idea.  Perhaps a Breitling forum might be able to help.  The "clicking" you feel when turning the crown I believe is normal function as the display functions change.  Good Luck.


RMD

Edited by rduckwor
typo
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Hey guys, just a short update. Thanks to rduckwor I was able to find a great paint and painted the watch bezel under the microscope.

I am very pleased with the result, it was pretty timeconsuming though... took me about 4 hours. Would definitly do it again and also recommend it to others if you feel confident in doing this kind of work.

By the way rduckwor send me a message with your PayPal email, your idea of emanel paint really helped me a lot and I would like to say thanks in some way.

If there are any questions just ask me anything. I am happy to help.

 

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beautiful job congratulations. I usually use glass paint, I suggest. this is my last example:

ps: I got a scratched lathe with sandpaper. I filled the 12-way index with phosphor and threw lacquer on it.

b575d31f70f56c31d03a502987cb3471.jpge591a085ac4c1c67e6bb8e6d8fb6d070.jpg


Before:

c412c8b0adf2789c5fb5b9820f0baccc.jpg

After:

696920cf733ff4c2ada15df26dacb052.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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