Jump to content
  • 0
Lorenz

Bezel paint reapply on a Breitling chronospace

Question

Hey guys, my name is Lorenz. I am an 18 year old electrical engineering student from Germany. 

I got this Breitling chronospace a56012.1 from my granddad and I want to repair it.

Besides a slight clicking noise while turning the crown ( someone please let me know if this is normal ) it works just fine.

My main problem is that the black color on the Bezel is worn out on some positions and I dont know where to find a paint that holds on the metal nor do I know how to paint it again.

I have worked with watches already, I disassembled a mechanical movement cleaned and oiled it again so I feel pretty confident in doing this job.

And I would also like to change out the crystal, does anyone know what size crystal I need for this watch?

Thanks in regards for any advice.

IMG_20190808_225348.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Lovely watch, I used to have one as well.  As for paint, I suspect enamel, probably for models, slightly thinned with thinner and a piece of very sharp peg wood.  I would carefully clean the area to be painted with solvent and allow it to flash off before trying to apply paint.  Otherwise, the paint may not adhere due to skin oils, etc.  As for crystal, no idea.  Perhaps a Breitling forum might be able to help.  The "clicking" you feel when turning the crown I believe is normal function as the display functions change.  Good Luck.


RMD

Edited by rduckwor
typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hey guys, just a short update. Thanks to rduckwor I was able to find a great paint and painted the watch bezel under the microscope.

I am very pleased with the result, it was pretty timeconsuming though... took me about 4 hours. Would definitly do it again and also recommend it to others if you feel confident in doing this kind of work.

By the way rduckwor send me a message with your PayPal email, your idea of emanel paint really helped me a lot and I would like to say thanks in some way.

If there are any questions just ask me anything. I am happy to help.

 

IMG_20190808_225348.jpg

IMG_20190813_004124.jpg

IMG_20190813_004205.jpg

IMG_20190813_004346.jpg

IMG_20190813_004607.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Similar Content

    • By rduckwor
      Early 60's Elgin 10K Shockmaster. I suppose one of their attempts at water proofing a watch (see the crystal and gasket in the second picture). The question is how to get the crown off (Its wobbly when pulled out to the set position and I am certain it contains a gasket) so I can remove the movement? Dis-assemble the keyless works in place so I can grab the stem and unscrew the crown?? Thanks.


    • By east3rn
      Hello! 
      I am working on a vintage watch and the crown of the watch is fitted with a hidden type gasket which is 
      in terrible condition and needs to be replaced.
      However, I found it difficult to pull the gasket out with my tweezers or tooth pick. 
      Could anyone recommend an easier way to remove this kind of gasket from the crown??
      I forgot to take a photo of the crown so I attached a similar example I found on the web.
       

    • By wilding
      Any advice out there for cleaning/polishing watch crystal glass?
      I know there are videos upon videos on howto clean acrylic watch crystal glass using toothpaste, Cape Cod cloths, an old toothbrush, etc.
      However, I am trying to get a number of scratches out of a watch crystal I have taken the movement out of. It is for me a "tester".
      I am fairly sure that this "tester" watch crystal is glass.
      I have sandpaper (wet/dry) and I have a Cape Cod cloth which I have just started using.
      I think you can see the scratches in question in the pics.
      So, what I have done so far is use 400-grit sandpaper to scrub across the grain of the scratches. I have also tried scrubbing in a circular motion.
      Maybe I am just not very persistent at this. I scrubbed for some time. But all I can see is that NOTHING is disappearing, and the only thing that IS happening is that now the whole glass is covered in a new set of sandpaper-made marks.
      Maybe I can use the Cape Cod cloth to get these out. Maybe I can use the other 1500-grit sandpaper to smooth things out too.
      This process looks so easy in the various Youtube videos. yes, I know these things can take time, but HOW LONG?? This is NOT one of the fun sides of watch repair that I am looking forward to doing now or, in fact, any time.
      I really thought that it would be the case that - scratches and marks on the crystal? No problem! I can get them out! :)
      But perhaps I was naive (?)
      How long should I be scrubbing with the sandpaper? Is 400-grit not enough? Should I get more coarse sandpaper?
    • By wilding
      Hello there watch fix fans. Here's (I hope) an interesting one for you.
      I have this beautiful small ladies 'Fero Feldmann' Swiss-made watch - it came in a bag of "used and to be repaired" watches.
      From what I can see, the mechanism seems in very good working order. Just a slight shake and it goes and goes. There is no strap, but that is not the issue here.
      The problem is the stem and/or crown. As you can see, there is definitely no crown. But I am wondering about the stem.
      The watch does have its case and edoes have, as you can see, a hole where the stem and/or crown will/should fit in.
      There is something which appears to be some kind of part-stem at the 3 o'clock position.
      Using tweezers I can pull it out and push it back in quite freely. A very small screw on top holds this "stem" in place. I think you can see, in ths second photo, how this "stem" attaches to the rest of the movement.
      Clearly I need to attach a crown. BUT what about a stem? A stem extension? Or one of those crowns which has an extended stem-like attachment which should fix onto this current "stem" in this watch?
      Yes, the watch face is somewhat scratched, and the minute hand is a little bent at the top. You may say it is not worth my while trying to get this fixed. But I just SO MUCH like this little watch and would LOVE to give it life again! It clearly IS still "alive" - though I'm not sure if it is a mechanical wind-up or an automatic. The latter of these seems to be the case - as I said earlier, a little shake and the mechanism goes and goes. PErhaps with a little oil (and lots of encouragement) it can be made good.
      So my main question - what kind of stem/crown to attach and how to do it?
       


    • By examiner
      How to remove this winding stem? I don't know what I should push to remove this winding stem.

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Update I discovered the setting lever when crown is pulled all the way out does not engage because (see picture below) the post on my timing lever is gone so the lever was not secured at axis point which limited the range in which the lever could full extend. I ordered a new one should be here in a week. I will keep you updated, what I think happened is someone pushed the setting lever post to allow stem to insert or remove and they pushed it to hard and broke it.
    • There is a Jasco made Naphta sold in hw home improvement stores in the US. It's described as being the thinner for varnish and enamel. It also says that it cleans greasy, waxy, oily surfaces and machine parts. Would this be safe to use on watch parts including balance complete?
    • Hello everyone, My name is John but you can call me Jack. I am new the group here and have been a hobbyist repairer for the past 2 + years. I mainly stick with mechanical watches but from time to time I will tinker with old quartz Seiko watches which I love. A current project that I have been trying to get down is a Seiko 4336 8129. This watch has been fighting me from the start. Well the movement was dead due to a broken pivot on the motor. So I sourced a replacement movement. Next Crystal was cracked so I removed the broken glass but can't figure out how to take the top bezel ring off. I have some pics. This poor watch has had a rough life. I was trying to bring it back!! Thank you for reading my tale of woe!!  
    • I am looking for a camera with a macro function to photograph my work.  I had a 18 or 20 megapixel Sony point and shoot that worked great for super close pics, but lost it in a fire.  Dont remember the model but it was a pocket sized camera I could zoom and focus on pallet stones with excellent definition.   It was less than $200 US.   Now I can’t find a camera that will do the job for less than $500  Any suggestions?
    • Can you repair my Timex Rally also? 
×
×
  • Create New...