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I have just completed two courses on watch repair by Mark, and I am in the process of servicing my first watch - a 565 cal. Omega Seamaster from 1979.

I have owned an automatic Tag Grand Carrera cal. 8 for the past decade, I don’t have any other watches apart from that. 

While I am new to restoring watches, I do have a few years of experience restoring vintage fountain pens. I have a modest collection of pre 1950 MBs, and I also have a website dedicated to vintage montblancs.

Anyway, I hope to learn much from this community and contribute to the pool of knowledge being built here!

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It may be wise to start on a watch movement you don't care about. It is easy to loose parts or break something. I also just finished the first two of Mark's courses and I am working on some cheap movements I got off of ebay. Just a thought.

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On 8/6/2019 at 12:11 AM, DFeryance said:

It may be wise to start on a watch movement you don't care about. It is easy to loose parts or break something. I also just finished the first two of Mark's courses and I am working on some cheap movements I got off of ebay. Just a thought.

Yes that would be wisest. I got this off eBay for a decent price - cheap enough to not hurt too bad if I mess it up, but at the same time nice enough to care about actually succeeding. You know what I mean?

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