Jump to content
  • 0
TheFixer

Mainspring Barrel Lube

Question

Hi, Gents.

Can I get away with using Moebius 8300 on the barrel walls of a Seiko 6309 automatic?

I have a new spring on the way from Cousins so any advice on fitting it would be welcome.

Many thanks.

 

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 1
43 minutes ago, vinn3 said:

  doesen't all grease slide or slip?    vin

Grease for auto barrels need to slip just enough. Moebius 8217 is the standard grease, Kluber P125 is also a standard if a bit more high tech grease. Then there is 8212, also known as Glissalube B, for aluminum barrels, and 8213, Glissalube A, for brass barrels. Easy to remember as the letter code matches the opposite metal. Some barrels/ calibers are very sensitive to the braking grease used, and may lose a significant amount of wind because of too slippery a braking grease, inversely, may overstress winding components if the grease is too aggressive at braking. Best to follow the manufacturer's advice, and when lacking that, go on experience. But 8217 is a good one to try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

So, @nickelsilver, I'm a bit confused. Do I get you right if I assume that all the mentioned greases, except the Glissalube A (8213), are for aluminium auto-barrels, and consequently that the Glissalube A (8213) is for brass auto-barrels? We would never need any of these greases for mechanical barrels, right? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
So, [mention=4990]nickelsilver[/mention], I'm a bit confused. Do I get you right if I assume that all the mentioned greases, except the Glissalube A (8213), are for aluminium auto-barrels, and consequently that the Glissalube A (8213) is for brass auto-barrels? We would never need any of these greases for mechanical barrels, right? Thanks!
Hmmm, well they are all for automatic barrels. Glissalube A for brass (not plated), B for aluminum (not seen that often anymore). 8217 and Kluber P125 are for anywhere (but doesn't necessarily mean they are ideal).

Manual wind watches have no need for these greases.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Based on the overwhelming responses that braking grease is necessary on automatic watches, and that 8217 is the correct grease to use, hobbyists such as myself find it a little difficult to justify $33 to purchase 20 ml, enough grease to service 1000 barrels (certain to expire long before it will be used).  This is particularly aggravating when the watches being used to learn on (a Seiko 7009A movement) is worth less than the oil itself.

So, is there any way of purchasing much smaller quantities of the oils/greases for much lower prices, saving us some change and reducing the waste due to expiration dates being exceeded?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I have used 8217 on several seiko models and they all seem to work ok.  I use it most for  inexpensive automatics and they seem ok. 

I think it is a good basic grease to have.   I wouldn't worry about the shelf life too much as long as the container is sealed well, kept cool and out of the light.  I just give it a good stir before I use it, this ensures the oil is remixed into the carrier medium.

I am currently trying it on a couple of cannon pinions (that are working ok but starting to feel a bit loose) to see if the extra friction gives any improvement in feel  !   Giving another use for it can only help re costs.

 

Edited by canthus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

The expiry dates are a new thing, and like food are a guideline. Barrel grease lasts ages, really it's not an issue. 30something bucks for an essential isn't so bad, if you stay in the hobby 3 years it's a buck a month to have what you need.

Maybe similar minded folks would do a group buy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

When you got your new spring, you can use the method that De Carle revealed in his book where you count the number of turns you get on the spring before slippage. From memory, you should get around five. If it’s way off then you may have a lubrication issue, or possibly barrel wall wear. However, you can compensate by adjusting the bridle. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 2/14/2020 at 2:15 PM, nickelsilver said:

The expiry dates are a new thing, and like food are a guideline. Barrel grease lasts ages, really it's not an issue. 30something bucks for an essential isn't so bad, if you stay in the hobby 3 years it's a buck a month to have what you need.

Maybe similar minded folks would do a group buy?

Interesting concept. Anyone interested?  Is there a group already discussing this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...