Jump to content

Seiko 5 7009-8210


Recommended Posts

Hi,

This is my first real experience with watch restoration. I've tinkered with movements previously and recently serviced an ETA 2824-2 in my Glycine but that's it. Please excuse any incorrect terminology I use, very new to this and just starting with my horology education. I bought a cheap but working Seiko 5 railway time with a view to dismantling, restoring (to a reasonable level) and servicing it. I'd like to be able to use it by the time i'm done.

It's pretty crusty with seals missing or worn, dusty old lume and doesn't run great but it has at least had some love over the years. Some pictures for the 'journey' so far;

20190720_140108.thumb.jpg.02490563302357e3909bf55e4e763731.jpg

 

20190721_154857.thumb.jpg.4f726b75a14ff5b452e421ac310c1f01.jpg

 

20190721_155405.thumb.jpg.6c672d5bc12da94700bda4e4886ed7bf.jpg

 

20190721_155407.thumb.jpg.da00bbf6a2291d6eb928de2727e1b1d7.jpg

 

The strip down went fine except for the Second reduction wheel screw which sheared when I tried to remove it. Luckily I managed to remove the thread without causing damage and have a replacement standing by. Please ignore the hair, was used for scale - I was showing off to family as I was so chuffed to remove such a small threaded shaft.

 

20190721_171425.thumb.jpg.285678c6a8909748a0763019967c94e5.jpg

 

It's currently in bits awaiting a good clean whilst I turn my attention to the crystal and case.

 

20190731_132524.thumb.jpg.85848e72891adf9aa96f469a116941f6.jpg#

20190731_132521.thumb.jpg.992f3c8fd4cbc9ae029d0656325f2bac.jpg

20190731_132518.thumb.jpg.8e6787cad22539be7185559d217bba25.jpg

20190731_142127.thumb.jpg.33bf6a7aa5cda19b3338ee360fcaa195.jpg

 

That leads me on to my first question. I couldn't locate a crystal gasket either residing in the case or stuck to the crystal. I'm sure it must have had one in an attempt to be water resistent. The gold coloured tensioning ring is present however. Does anyone know what type of gasket I require to properly seat/seal the crystal? Looking at Cousins in the UK I see the 'I' or 'L' types but i'm unsure and also of the correct way to size the gasket. Any help would be appreciated. Some images below of sizing.

20190731_123836.thumb.jpg.44988acecee1d89b507405069d5a6139.jpg

20190731_123904.thumb.jpg.cd78f69729dca1cde36cdb98ec2a37b0.jpg

20190731_123936.thumb.jpg.abbca1847166a698574c488ea3543187.jpg

20190731_123717.thumb.jpg.14ecd70c286230833c7d8b91ab97c642.jpg

 

I'll update further as I progress.

Thanks, Ben.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, benemos said:

That leads me on to my first question. I couldn't locate a crystal gasket either residing in the case or stuck to the crystal. I'm sure it must have had one in an attempt to be water resistent. The gold coloured tensioning ring is present however. Does anyone know what type of gasket I require to properly seat/seal the crystal? Looking at Cousins in the UK I see the 'I' or 'L' types but i'm unsure and also of the correct way to size the gasket. Any help would be appreciated. Some images below of sizing.

It there is a tension ring there won't be a gasket. Water resistance will be based on surfaces (tight) contact and owner's responsibility.

Edited by jdm
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, jdm said:

It there is a tension ring there won't be a gasket. Water resistance will be based on surfaces (tight) contact and owner's responsibility.

That's great, thanks for the info.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, anilv said:

The reduction wheel screw is a left-hand thread. Basically anything with three lines on it is left-hand threaded.

Just in case you were not aware!

Anilv

Indeed. I remembered this time but I suppose it's easily overlooked. I think I'll keep a few of those screws spare in future!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Yes you will find them on ebay. No cal or ref as I have already said parts are not interchangeable. It does not have a balance staff it has a cylinder  which watchweasol has already pointed out. Here are a few photos so you can see the difference. A cylinder movement is not a good place to start for a beginner. Photo 1 Cylinder. Photo 2 Balance staff. Photo 3 Cylinder escapement. Photo 4 Balance staff escapement also called an Anchor escapement.
    • It sounds as though you are happy with this situation and have no ill feelings towards Swiss manufacturers whatsoever.  😄
    • Hey everyone I enjoy tinkering and used to get my fix by making knives, but with a baby (now toddler) that hobby has been put on pause.  My co-workers dad used to be a watchmaker but had to stop due to arthritis. I was lucky enough for him to give me some basic supplies to get started along with some busted movements and books. After destroying one movement I signed up for Mark's online course and have made my way through half of it while working on a couple of my own movements. Eventually I'd like to get to the point where I can buy vintage pieces and restore a handful a year. There is surprisingly little information on watchmaking and this forum has already been a great help. Cheers! Adam  
    • Any chance you can take some pictures and give a quick review of the tool? I suspect many of us will be quite interested in this tool.   I agree that some of the Swiss-branded tools are at least made in part in China, but touched-up/finished marginally in Switzerland. On the other hand, some of the Chinese tools are really a direct clone of the tool, which wouldn’t be so vexing if they actually worked as advertised: I bought some pallet forks for 2824-2 from china which were advertised to be compatible with ETA 2824-2 but couldn’t fit in the jewels. I have had better experience with Chinese tools that have their their own branding (such as Weishi), but even then, there are sometimes multiple listings on AliExpress of seemingly identical items with different Chinese brands. I would think that if one was a Chinese-speaking watch enthusiast in China, it would be easier to locate reliable Chinese tool manufacturers (as @HectorLooi previously mentioned) but for us, we have to rely on actual reviews from people who own the item!
    • Wow a thousand pound watch and the stem removal is booby traped by poor design 😎
×
×
  • Create New...