Jump to content
deni2s

1930ties Landeron Hahn 2 monopusher as a project?

Recommended Posts

Sourced this watch, want to know your thoughts about it. Like the looks of early Landeron Hahn 15 1/2  dials. Looks like this is Landeron Hahn 2 (judging by 45 minutes register)?

I am new to watches, so any insight/thoughts/help are welcome.

Here are some questions I already have:

1) What do you think about restoring this one?
2) How hard would be to source the bezel for it? Where to look for it? Looks like case is quite large - 40mm in diameter. I assume sourcing mineral crystal later shouldn't be a problem?
3) How to fix that broken fixed lug? Or it's better to transform to non-fixed lugs?
4) Movement looks complete to me, seller says balance swings nicely (i hope so), hopefully just needs cleaning/oiling. Or you can already spot something off?
5) Missing seconds hand shouldn't be an issue? Probably regular Landeron should fit with 0,25 or 0,27 hole size?
6) What to do with hands (assuming seconds hand will be new, unless I will source by some miracle something with matching condition).

Looks like someone restored similar watch: https://www.watchpatrol.net/listing/611413/

26913530.jpg

26913534.jpg

26913535.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The problem with these very early chronographs is getting the parts, which is not easy for a movement that had a short production run and is 80+ years old, the bezel you would probably have to make on a lathe as I doubt you will find one, the strap bars could be drilled out and replaced or soldered, when restoring a watch it is always where practical to keep it as manufactured , you also have a broken minute register jumper spring.

Quite often when you acquire watches like this you have to have the patience of a saint and put them on the back burner, whilst you search for parts, it is worth restoring but be prepared for a long haul project.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that minute register jumper spring is not broken, maybe just not the best angle of that pic. If all parts will be ok, there is a chance it will not be very long project maybe...

So basically my steps might be:

  1. Get the movement going (checking all parts)
  2. Clean and oil the movement.
  3. Source and install seconds hand
  4. Maybe re-blue hands (or replace with new if available?)
  5. Get new bezel done, glass pressed (this is above my skills/toolset, will need to order)
  6. Solder strap bar (to keep original condition)
  7. Rechrome the case?

26913540.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Received the watch. Good news - watch is ticking, all parts (except bezel with glass, seconds hand and crown) are here. Dial actually looks metallic (very close in colour to case, not white as in photos).

Bad things noticed - can't set the time (can't get winding stem in adjustment position), watch is very dirty, hours hand is bent to one side and looks a bit rusted, and chrono minutes register hand is not moving very well, it looks that it's jewel has crack (will post a photo later).

Don't have the skills and knowledge to replace the jewel - is it easy to find a replacement?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/18/2019 at 6:38 AM, deni2s said:

Received the watch. Good news - watch is ticking, all parts (except bezel with glass, seconds hand and crown) are here. Dial actually looks metallic (very close in colour to case, not white as in photos).

Bad things noticed - can't set the time (can't get winding stem in adjustment position), watch is very dirty, hours hand is bent to one side and looks a bit rusted, and chrono minutes register hand is not moving very well, it looks that it's jewel has crack (will post a photo later).

Don't have the skills and knowledge to replace the jewel - is it easy to find a replacement?

I usually dig around in my parts bin to find a jewel that is correct pivot size and then press and fit that.
I found a perfect jewel for an Omega 1040 pivot from a Soviet Slava movement (my point is you can use any movement as long as it same size and spec).

It sounds like you should find someone to take on the casework (I use replateit.com to do mine - they did a fab job on a similar zinc or similar material case for me recently and they even cut the wire lugs off and drilled holes for a strap well).

Realistically, you've probably picked a tricky watch to do as a junior watchmaker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some update... 

I left the case with movement at watchmaker for welding the lug, making bezel, putting the crystal, polishing and replating the case. Asked to keep the caseback as it is.

Minutes hand broke off when I tried to straighten it, and watchmaker said that looks like hours hand was modified to fit. Sourced some sets of hands on ebay, I hope they will fit. Still looking for sweeping chrono seconds hand. If standard Landeron 0,27mm or 0,25mm hand fit, then it's easy, but I left the movement at watchmaker, so can't really measure at the moment. If anyone knows the hand measurements for early Landeron Hahn, please, let me know.

According to watchmaker that one jewel is fine, it wasn't a crack on it, but some dust. Maybe there is another issue, but I decided to start with case, and check the movement later, as it's ticking, so hopefully there will be not much issues. Meanwhile I can practice on simpler movements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

welcome to the forum. my favorate suggeston is "when you take the stem out of the case, put it back in as soon as posable".  as there is a winding gear in there thay may capsize.  then you willhave to take the dial off to relocate the crown gear.   welcome and good luck.  vin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote
3 minutes ago, vinn3 said:

welcome to the forum. my favorate suggeston is "when you take the stem out of the case, put it back in as soon as posable".  as there is a winding gear in there thay may capsize.  then you willhave to take the dial off to relocate the crown gear.   welcome and good luck.  vin

Looks like there is already some issue, as set is not being engaged. Hopefully something minor. But I haven't yet done anything with movement (it's currently at watchmakers who makes the bezel and restores the case).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/14/2019 at 5:25 PM, vinn3 said:

good show;  best let him restore it.   work on the next one.  cheers  vin

Probably that's what I will do. Already working on couple other projects - Venus 170 movement and divers watch with AS 1686 movement.

Was checking online resources and according to this page http://vintagewatch.heimat.eu/TomsWatchpage/Chrono_Movements/Chrono_Movements_2/chrono_movements_2.html it's not Landeron 2, but Landeron 3 15 1/2 movement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Watchtime said:

hat off for your courage ,...these are more complicated watches to work on...

Thanks! AS 1686 was beaten watch, so I wasn't  afraid to ruin much (actually I stripped crown wheel screw, as I thought the counterclockwise screw is on ratchet wheel due to lack of experience. But already ordered the screw to replace.) And for venus 170 I bought several non-working movements on ebay, and one of them has nice Côtes de Genève, which I think is not very common for venus 170, so I plan to make it complete and working using other spare movements. And in process I see what I need to improve in my skills and which tools do I need to upgrade. (Like lighting, better tweezers, some containers for small parts, better watch movement holder, better magnifying glass, etc...) And I just bought another Landeron 3 watch on ebay with broken stem, so that might be another interesting challenge, to make it work again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Similar Content

    • By deni2s
      Sourced on ebay some relatively inexpensive Landeron 3 watch. Looks like 30ties, all original. 40mm diameter without crown.
      Watch was sold for parts or repairs. This is all info what I got from seller:
      Watch looks very dirty (I will not wonder if that dirt is still from war)...
      Balance completely disassembled, but all parts present (in the same box as watch, at least hairspring was in container).
      One of the pusher levers is broken (but broken piece is there).
      Other pusher was not properly installed (fixed that already).
      Foil disc from under dial is also there inside the box.
      Dial was not tightened enough, so small register seconds hand was hanging around under scratched glass.
      Mainspring was fully wounded.
      I don't know what to think about that... I mean, I am a beginner, but at least I wouldn't left wounded mainspring, and probably disassembled balance parts I wouldn't just throw in a box with the watch.
      When I look at the balance staff, it doesn't look so bad to me (see the pics and comment please, I might be wrong), so I wonder, why it's disassembled. Could it be, that watch stopped working because of dirt/old oil, and someone unexperienced decided that balance needs to be disassembled?
      Any ideas where to start? I was thinking about bringing it to watchmaker to check/assemble the balance, and see if it swings more or less fine, and after that start with cleaning/oiling.
       


       
       
       

      P.S. Does anyone has spare pusher levers for this movement? Or could some laser welding work to fix broken one, or that will not be strong enough?
      And any suggestions about hands - should I restore them (blue layer is coming off at some parts) or keep them "patinated" as they are?
    • By matabog
      Hello!
      Do you oil the shouldered “safety” screws that hold in place the coupling clutch 8080, the sliding gear 8100 or the hammer 8219? If so, do you also put a very tiny drop of hp 1300 under them?

       
      you can find the entire doc here: http://watchguy.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Le-Landeron-48.pdf
       
       
      Thank you!
      Bogdan
    • By GeorgeClarkson
      Since I was working on the Landeron 48 with wrong dial, from which I used the case and a Landeron 151 and correct dial to make a new watch, I saw this Landeron 248 sitting in the drawer at my desk and devided to finally tackle the issue it had: a slipping mainspring.
      I documented the disassembly of the movement vith 3 videos, the first of which is here below:
      Hope you enjoy
       
    • By GeorgeClarkson
      Some of you already know that I bought myself as a birthday present, and to celebrate the birth of my first daughter, a Landeron 248 based Chronograph to restore / fix, and that I thought that it was a redial. Here the thread about it:

      Apparently it is not only the case ot a simple redial (albeit with a wrong dial which was adapted) but what I would define as "watchmaker's botchery", since the dial itself was fixed to the case with 2 screws (and from the front side...):
       



  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi gurus,  I'm working on an ETA 1164 triple calendar movement and the day disc does not line up well with its window, see picture. The jumper action seems fine and there are three jumpers for the date mechanism which are all identical.  Has anyone incurred such issues before with this movement? Is the only remedy to adjust the profile of the jumper? --  Best regards, Stian
    • Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum.
    • Yes it does, but not enough to endanger the fitting of the pivot into the hole. Burnishing removes the faint marks left in the steel after turning/alteration due to wear or cutting a new pivot. It creates an extremely fine finish, like a mirror finish. It also helps in the rotation of the pivot, preventing it from binding in the hole. If you gauged before and after I don’t think it would change, providing the work has been carried out correctly.
    • Enicar had two type of caseback.. the bayonet type and a screw type. The giveaway is a little triangle around the edge of the caseback. I believe this was supposed to line up with a reference on the case.. or maybe the crown. Good job figuring it out, took me a while too! Anilv
    • I’m inclined to agree with what JohnR says. But I’d also like to add some of my own cynicism which is that I think that the snake oil manufacturers will sell you anything if they can see a gap in the market.  But, I can see why it makes sense to have something very slippery and less likely to be pushed away than a light synthetic oil. That possibly is more important for high beat movement where there is a greater velocity.  With regards to “which is best”, I don’t think anyone should offer any opinions unless they have revisited work they have completed over a span of several years. I’ve been using 9415 for several years, but I’m yet to investigate its effectiveness long term. 
×
×
  • Create New...