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DoctoralHermit

Aspiring servicer with dreams of Russia

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Hey everyone! 

I bought my first automatic watch, a 7s26, a little over 5 years ago. Recently, I picked up some vintage Russian watches and fell in love. I'd love to be able to buy old Russian treasures on the cheap and service them myself! But first, my plan is to start with Nickolas Hacko's 7s26 tutorial.

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1 hour ago, DoctoralHermit said:

But first, my plan is to start with Nickolas Hacko's 7s26 tutorial.

Welcome here.

Nick takes some steps that are debatable in his incomplete tutorial (calendar re-assembly wasn't ever done). I suggest that you look first at the "servicing walkthrough" on this forum, and Mark Lovick's videos on YouTube.

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20 minutes ago, jdm said:

Welcome here.

Nick takes some steps that are debatable in his incomplete tutorial (calendar re-assembly wasn't ever done). I suggest that you look first at the "servicing walkthrough" on this forum, and Mark Lovick's videos on YouTube.

Wow, thank you for the heads up! I'll definitely reconsider my decision to go with Hacko.

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1 hour ago, DoctoralHermit said:

Wow, thank you for the heads up! I'll definitely reconsider my decision to go with Hacko.

Don't get me wrong, he's surely a good watchmaker and commendable for having published his work a long time ago already. But the 7S26 is so popular that you can easily find multiple sources of information and learn even from the small differences that there are.

Edited by jdm

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Nothing wrong with Russian watches.actually they are quite good.if you get one that hasn't been too severely abused.I would tell you to start on them..simple no date versions manual wind.then move to the more complex.

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