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USA East Coast Watch Repair Pro ?

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Hi All- I read a lot of post on several websites cincerning manufacturers exorbitant pricing but from past recent experience, finding a watch repair professional that actually answers emails is harder than finding a gold nugget on a hiking trail.

I am in for the long hall, wanting to learn the watch repair bisiness as a hobby but with a professional learning experience, I have the time and willing to learn no matter where it takes me. Already started purchasing tools of the trade... 

One thing I am sure about, I do not want to service my nice watches myself. But, I would be intereested in contacting a reputable watch service professional instead of going to manufacturer. I contacted a supposedly reputable shop on US West coast (No disrespect intended)  but got not answer and not holding my breath :) 

Have automatics Omega, Ball and Zenith to service. 

Can anyone recommend someone on US East coast ? 

PS: To tell you the truth, I love my replica Submariner. It’s accuratly 20s fast per day, but I suppose it can also be adjusted since it’s not eraticlly fast. Although it does not seem to have any issues except being a little fast - too fast for my taste, would also consider having it services and adjusted as well just to be happy for next several years :) 

Thank you,

AJ

Edited by ajdo

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there is plenty of watch and clock repairmen in the USA .   it is the same old problem "who can you trust".  i would sugest asking the National Watch and Clock Socety (sp).  or a parts supplier like Freid.  the US should start its own forum?  vin

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3 hours ago, oldhippy said:

Is there anyone close to where you live that undertakes watch repairs?

Not that know personally/ professionally or by reputation. A quick google search of course came up with list of shops. I feel it’s trickier than having to repair a PC and would rather wait for a warm introduction to someone that knows someone than rushing into the first shop I find. 

I may go the manufacturer’s route if it’s like finding a needle in a haystack.   

I appreciate everyone’s responses :thumup:

AJ

 

 

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Let see if we can get Mark lovic to service them, wouldn,t hurt to ask.
I think he just may want to make a video( lesson) out of it.
Just a thought.
Isn't he living in Thailand?

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2 hours ago, ro63rto said:
11 hours ago, Nucejoe said:
Let see if we can get Mark lovic to service them, wouldn,t hurt to ask.
I think he just may want to make a video( lesson) out of it.
Just a thought.

Isn't he living in Thailand?

Is Mark on vacation in Thailand or What. 

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research IWW international watch works - you ship the watch to him but prepare to wait a few months, he is really good and does not work on chronos. sometimes you have to ship a watch to get the best service. there is also a guy in my state NJ. Farvo.com. he does a lot of vintage watches and restorations. but he does have high end watches on his site. I used him from an old 40s breitling chronomat

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1 hour ago, saswatch88 said:

research IWW international watch works - you ship the watch to him but prepare to wait a few months,

I object to the practice of keeping repair items untouched for a long time, which includes some Swiss manufacturers. The repairer should take the work at the time he's ready to begin with a reservation and deposit system. 

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6 hours ago, saswatch88 said:

research IWW international watch works - you ship the watch to him but prepare to wait a few months, he is really good and does not work on chronos. sometimes you have to ship a watch to get the best service. there is also a guy in my state NJ. Farvo.com. he does a lot of vintage watches and restorations. but he does have high end watches on his site. I used him from an old 40s breitling chronomat

 

6 hours ago, saswatch88 said:

research IWW international watch works - you ship the watch to him but prepare to wait a few months, he is really good and does not work on chronos. sometimes you have to ship a watch to get the best service. there is also a guy in my state NJ. Farvo.com. he does a lot of vintage watches and restorations. but he does have high end watches on his site. I used him from an old 40s breitling chronomat

Thank you for information. IWW seems to have major health issues, read information on his webiste. I wish him well!

https://www.internationalwatchworks.com/note-from-jack

Farvo.com unless spelled incorrectly, domain is for sale. 

As mention in a previous post, after doing more research I found Al (Archer) on the Omega forum. He is located in CA, close enough for me. He has great reputation but most importantly, he responded to emails swiftly. 

There are 2 sides to a profession, the “trade” and the “business” side. People may be competant in their trade but I cannot understand in 2019, professionals that do not answer emails in a timely manner; at least within 2 weeks. 

I may be opening a cane of worms but to me it shows bad organisation, lack of professionalism and none-respect for the customer. It’s not that one needs to write letter and go to post office to mail letter anymore. I am not asking for watch professionals to get on every useless social media platform available out there but if they they have an email addess, have the respect to the customer to at least send an quick answer.

Yes, everyone is very busy, and everyone feel they are busier than others. The trade (any trade) is only half of the equation, the other half is business, meaning the customer. 

Fixing an object - what ever trade one is in is one thing, satisfying the customer -meant in a good way, is why clients come back for more. 

Just my 2 cents :)

AJ

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, jdm said:

I object to the practice of keeping repair items untouched for a long time, which includes some Swiss manufacturers. The repairer should take the work at the time he's ready to begin with a reservation and deposit system. 

@JDM- I agree fully with what you wrote. Unfortunately it seems the norm in the watch business.  

A similar situation came up when I moved to the US 20 years ago. There was something I just could not understand people here were doing -from East to West coast - that was done so much more efficiently on the old continent. I realized I had 2 choices, either convince 400 million people I was correct or just deal with it :)

It is hard enough to get watchmakers and repairers to answer emails, I would not dare try to change thier working habits :))

AJ 

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Having been an American my whole life, Let me say this. We tend to jump on what is new and disregard what is old.The cost of labor here, being what it is, we tend to automate everything.The educational system is such that the highly literate and educated tend towards "hands off " employment and the less literate and educated towards the "hands on". finding an educated ,literate person, who works with his hands can be a problem.

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On 7/6/2019 at 9:16 AM, ajdo said:

 

Thank you for information. IWW seems to have major health issues, read information on his webiste. I wish him well!

https://www.internationalwatchworks.com/note-from-jack

Farvo.com unless spelled incorrectly, domain is for sale. 

As mention in a previous post, after doing more research I found Al (Archer) on the Omega forum. He is located in CA, close enough for me. He has great reputation but most importantly, he responded to emails swiftly. 

There are 2 sides to a profession, the “trade” and the “business” side. People may be competant in their trade but I cannot understand in 2019, professionals that do not answer emails in a timely manner; at least within 2 weeks. 

I may be opening a cane of worms but to me it shows bad organisation, lack of professionalism and none-respect for the customer. It’s not that one needs to write letter and go to post office to mail letter anymore. I am not asking for watch professionals to get on every useless social media platform available out there but if they they have an email addess, have the respect to the customer to at least send an quick answer.

Yes, everyone is very busy, and everyone feel they are busier than others. The trade (any trade) is only half of the equation, the other half is business, meaning the customer. 

Fixing an object - what ever trade one is in is one thing, satisfying the customer -meant in a good way, is why clients come back for more. 

Just my 2 cents :)

AJ

 

 

 

its farfo.com dont put the www. or just google farfo vintage watches ridgewood nj. archer is a memeber on teh Watchuseek forums and is very good esp when it comes to high end watches like omega. he is a certified omega repairer, not many of those around. he uses the same equipment they uses at the omega facilities. 100,000s worth of equipment

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Much appreciated. Contacted Archer who answer quickly and very professionally. Unfortunatly, I decided to sale of my current nice watches, did not see the purpose of paying over $1500 for watches I never or rarely wear. These nice watches purchased many moons ago are not me anymore, need to update my watch wardrobe :)

To tell tou the truth, my favorite watch is a Rolex Submariner-Date clone Seagull ST2130 that was given to me several years ago and I wear daily. It is 20s fast accuratly and wears very well. Glad I did not have to pay what it really costs. Would like to have it serviced and adjusted but most watch reoaites do not touch copies. 

I do not understand the clone issue, like any patent, a model expires, why can’t cloners sales copies like we can buy less expensive medication after patent expires ?

Like any watch novice then, I never understood the cost of servicing nice watched years ago. Lesson learned! 

Most importantly, in past few months (apart from Archer who was very detailed and professional) had the worst communication experience with Zenith (LVMH) and Omega, not helpfull at all. My biggest surprise was Ball with whom I had excellent customer service answers and solutions. They will certailny get my business in the future. I was disapointed by others though, one buy expensive watches, one would at least be treated like a client and not like cattle. 

Will try farfo.com as well in near future. Thank you for correcting their website info. 

Thsnk you Ball watch for your excellent customer service. Shame on you Zenith (LVMH) and Omega main customer service for useless worst communication and customer service ever! Felt like I was dealing with 1960’s used car salemen one see in movies, and maybe worst... 

AJ

 

 

Edited by ajdo

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9 hours ago, ajdo said:

To tell tou the truth, my favorite watch is a Rolex Submariner-Date clone Seagull ST2130 that was given to me several years ago and I wear daily. It is 20s fast accuratly and wears very well. Glad I did not have to pay what it really costs. Would like to have it serviced and adjusted but most watch reoaites do not touch copies. 

I do not understand the clone issue, like any patent, a model expires, why can’t cloners sales copies like we can buy less expensive medication after patent expires ?

Are we talking about clones, replicas which are actually counterfeit items? Which is a crime in any jurisdiction, no surprise professional don;t touch them.

You can of course have honest, perfectly legal watches that look like famous ones or even better as in the microbrand segment, cost a fraction and  do not try to deceive anyone by carrying brand names, or logos that are owned by others. Unlike patents, these never expires. These watches are called "homages" and there is a great variety of these around, using Swiss or Japanese mov'ts that can be normally repaired and serviced.

In all cases unfortunately the high cost of periodical servicing a mechanical watch makes so that owning and maintaining even few ones has become a luxury. 

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13 hours ago, jdm said:

Are we talking about clones, replicas which are actually counterfeit items? Which is a crime in any jurisdiction, no surprise professional don;t touch them.

You can of course have honest, perfectly legal watches that look like famous ones or even better as in the microbrand segment, cost a fraction and  do not try to deceive anyone by carrying brand names, or logos that are owned by others. Unlike patents, these never expires. These watches are called "homages" and there is a great variety of these around, using Swiss or Japanese mov'ts that can be normally repaired and serviced.

In all cases unfortunately the high cost of periodical servicing a mechanical watch makes so that owning and maintaining even few ones has become a luxury. 

I appreciate the explanation. I agree, a watch with a brand name but fake or clone should be illegal. Same clone watch with no brand logo should be permited. 

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There is a guy in the Dallas, Texas area, Bob Ridley, that is a sought after Rolex mechanic and he may be able to help. You can google his name and will find lots of info. He is one of the best.

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