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manodeoro

14000 Air-King dial ... badly damaged

Question

Rolex is well known for it's so-called "tool watches" but I never thought anybody would ever take this expression too literally and use an early 14000 as a hammer or an anvil

I don't think I can do anything to repair so it will be just well cleaned and put back in it's case.

That's too bad because apart from those scratches the dial is in really nice condition for a 26 years old one.

Nevertheless ... If one of the members here has any idea and/or experience in taking care of such a mess ... advices are welcomed

 

... I knew I should have said NO when the Mr Hulk asked me if I could repair his watch ...

 

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What about using a fiber pen or will that scratch the dial? 
That will scratch and remove the "soleillé" ( sunburst) pattern.
The problem is that it's not just stains but real scratches ... really deep as one can even see the copper plate under the silver coating.



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1 minute ago, manodeoro said:

That will scratch and remove the "soleillé" ( sunburst) pattern.
The problem is that it's not just stains but real scratches ... really deep as one can even see the copper plate under the silver coating.



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damn that sucks. I hope someone can help you out mate!

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Looks bad in close up but I would imagine its pretty unnoticeable on the wrist.

I have 'repaired' similar damage by using a pin dipped in silver paint and filling in the bigger spots where the paint has chipped away. Since the only real option apart from a new dial fro Rolex is to re-finish the dial you wont have anything to lose.

Good luck

Anilv

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Looks bad in close up but I would imagine its pretty unnoticeable on the wrist.

I have 'repaired' similar damage by using a pin dipped in silver paint and filling in the bigger spots where the paint has chipped away. Since the only real option apart from a new dial fro Rolex is to re-finish the dial you wont have anything to lose.

Good luck

Anilv

Thanks anilv ... sounds like a great idea

 

I had already thought about trying to mask the scratches by using water based silver paint but the thinnest of the brushes I've found is already too large.

But a pin is thinner and won't absorb the paint so I can put very little amounts of paint so it won't spread around the scratches while I'll fill them.

I can even try with one of those very thin and sharp needles used to sew the silk.

 

Next week I'll buy a set of needles for silk and some silver paint and as soon as I have 2 or 3 hours of real free time (wife away ) I'll take my chance with that method.

Thanks again !!!

 

BTW ... thought really tinny the scratches are noticeable in real because of the copper color ... but if filling them with silver paint is a success they will be almost invisible.

 

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The only way to have this repaired is to have it restored by a professional dial restorer. It will cost a packet. An amateur or hobbyist will never be able to repair it invisibly.   

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His samples show why an original dial should be kept as far as possible.
The dials look new, but in many cases the print is far from original. E.g. compare the subsecond dials before and after!

Dial reprinting is always a risk if you rely on the refinisher and do not check his print in advance. It can reduce the value of a watch considerably.

Problem is, making a steel die is very expensive, so the refinisher will use what he has in stock. 

Frank

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@clockboy thanks for the link ... nevertheless I don't think I'd go that way for 2 reasons

- $160 but "dials with batons are the most expensive as is a satin finish" so that one would certainly cost more because of the sunburst finish

- almost all the reprintings are innacurate  (wrong police, wrong positioning, etc ...)

I'll ask M. Hulk about a refinishing process but I won't take no responsability if he goes that way.

If it was my own watch I would a hundred times prefer to keep the original printings with the right police and serifs and try to make the scratches less visible  than to have no more scratches but  innacurate printings.

The value of the watch has been, as @oldhippy already stated, considerably reduced.

So it's now just a question of what makes the specific charm of a watch ... looking new or looking genuine ?

Personnaly I agree with @praezis so I'll probably try the needle + paint way at first and see how it looks.

Of course I'll use water-based silver paint and try on 1 scratch first and post here to ask for opinions before going further.

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