Jump to content
Johnnie

Your very first watch ?

Recommended Posts

Hi all, was just wondering what was the very first proper watch other forum members ever owned? In my case it was a Nidor Vibraflex 17 jewel manual wind, that my nan bought me in 1966. Hopefully one will pop up on eBay as I have lost the original ! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Couldn't say what the brand was but it was a mechanical winding watch and on the dial was a native American Indian on horseback and instead of a seconds hand he held a tomahawk which ratcheted back and forth, almost like the motion of a pallet fork.

Cannot tell you how much I wish I still had it. If only as a reminder of my parents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, m1ks said:

Couldn't say what the brand was but it was a mechanical winding watch and on the dial was a native American Indian on horseback and instead of a seconds hand he held a tomahawk which ratcheted back and forth, almost like the motion of a pallet fork.

Cannot tell you how much I wish I still had it. If only as a reminder of my parents.

I have a similar one but with a cowboy! Somewhere I have a cowgirl too. It is indeed the pallet fork that gives the motion.

My first watch was a Frogger watch, followed by a first gen G Shock. Then a quartz Seiko diver, and finally got an Omega automatic just before I went to watchmaking school. I didn't want to show up with a quartz.

20190625_120239.jpg

nelsonic-frogger.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first watch was a Adram divers watch with a EB 8012 movement. This was a birthday present and was subsequently the first way I attempted to repair (age 11). Ironically a few years ago my brother found it and I re-furbished it as it runs great. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First watch was a Kered    from Shepherds of the shambles in York, alas no longer in business. The plus side is I still have the watch it was a 21st birthday pressie, and even better it still ticks  54 years later although the dial has a water mark ,    I even wore it playing cricket for 12 years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pierre Chevelle. gran sport 150. My father got it for me about 50 years ago.A cigar smoker ,he got it in exchange for cigar bands from the Phillies he smoked.Still have it. I just installed a new crystal.It awaits a clean lube and adjust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I received a Wyler 1162 from Dad for graduation.  Just a simple,  no date 17J.  Still have it and recently gave it a clean & oil with new mainspring.   Not in service yet as no crystal is available.  I bought a PA460, but the inside is too small.  I scraped and polished until it was too big!  I'll order another and try it again...

The original crystal is still basically serviceable but is green.  Honest to goodness dark green.  It had a green leather strap that got misplaced over the years.  Wonder if others recall colored crystals?  This is the only one I recall seeing.

If Dad had just gone down another block, a jeweler sold Bulova and a new brand by the name of Seiko!

Oh I had a Westclox pocket watch and a Timex before the Wyler.  They are long since gone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never encountered coloured crystals, but I suspect you could simply use glass paints on a standard crystal.

I would suggest practicing on some scrap crystals first. Stick the outside surface of the  crystal centered on to a Dremel disk mandrel with blue tac. Spin the crystal, and touch a small spot of paint to the inside center of the crystal with a brush and the spinning action should give a uniform coverage. This might get a little messy, as the paint may fly about.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine was a stainless steel Tissot Seastar Seven Automatic that my Dad bought me when I started work in 1962. I still have it now and it started me on a lifelong passion for vintage Tissot watches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/25/2019 at 5:10 PM, vinn3 said:

are we talking about round wylers?  the special crystols are hard to find. there were several colors.     vin

Yep.  "Waterproof" with press on collar.  I've never encountered another colored one.  It's Avocado green!  The color was all the rage at that time.  Even on kitchen appliances.

It is green through and through.  I still have the crystal.  Just needs really serious polishing.  The watch has black luminous hands on a silver dial and looks pretty good in clear. 

Eventually!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, AndyHull said:

I've never encountered coloured crystals, but I suspect you could simply use glass paints on a standard crystal.

 

Standard crystal is the problem.  G-S lists one, but the model 1162 is apparently used on other cases.  I bought the one listed and it's the correct outside size.  Inside is too small and I don't own a lathe yet!

One thing I've learned:  It's always something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, ro63rto said:

Mine was nothing fancy.

Bought with my very first weekly wage packet back in 1990 and I still have it. Works perfectly.

 

6Dnd8y7.thumb.jpg.0e1ad5d1ef4db253c130a5a59ee4fb7e.jpg

 

 

Neat!  Center seconds hand? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 2:13 AM, AndyHull said:

I've never encountered coloured crystals, but I suspect you could simply use glass paints on a standard crystal.

I would suggest practicing on some scrap crystals first. Stick the outside surface of the  crystal centered on to a Dremel disk mandrel with blue tac. Spin the crystal, and touch a small spot of paint to the inside center of the crystal with a brush and the spinning action should give a uniform coverage. This might get a little messy, as the paint may fly about.

 

    colored crystals: the color is part of the formula,  not painted.  vin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, nichod said:

Standard crystal is the problem.  G-S lists one, but the model 1162 is apparently used on other cases.  I bought the one listed and it's the correct outside size.  Inside is too small and I don't own a lathe yet!

One thing I've learned:  It's always something.

      it must be the wrong crystol.   the inner and outer diameters are critical to the inner and outer ring (bezel).  that is the "draw back" of that watch.  vin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, ro63rto said:

Yes it is, when you press the bottom left pusher, it resets to zero to become the chrono second. Top right starts the chrono.
It has the Miyota 3s10 movement.

Interesting.  I prefer a seconds hand that works for a living!  Always kept me from the 7750 types.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, vinn3 said:

      it must be the wrong crystol.   the inner and outer diameters are critical to the inner and outer ring (bezel).  that is the "draw back" of that watch.  vin

Yes. Wrong is what it is.  The catalog lists outer diameter only.  I made an attempt at enlarging the inside by scraping with a knife.  That could work.  Got close!  In my zeal the crystal got a couple of scratches above the mounting surface.  By polishing those out, the inner diameter got enlarged.  I'll try another next time I place an order.

In my collection is another Wyler of the same style with the ESA9150 movement.  I've hit a wall trying to re-crystal it also.  I wish my home town jeweler had sold a different brand!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting.  Don't recall those.

I really was only in the Wyler shop one time.  I started work in the local radio station and discovered what a large bulk tape eraser can do to a hairspring...

The fellow knew his hairsprings.  He UN-knotted  it and it still works but I hold my breath when I demagnetize a watch!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if de mag ing,   it is good to remove the balance and run it thru the magnet separtly  -- on vintage watches.   beside the square wylers;    i have one of their pocket watches.  keep up the good work.  vin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • hope it helps.  As it seems you are UK based, you also might inquire about a local model engineering club.  Most of what I saw in the video was fairly generic stuff and may appeal to various hobbies centre around machining other than horology (and many model engineers also build clocks).  The UK is the centre for model engineering, you might find that including that fraternity greatly increases the target market size
    • It seems an odd choice, but it may not do harm.  imo there is no reason to use a multiweight oil,  but maybe there are good reasons I missed.  I also don't see a reason to use a synthetic oil, won't hurt, but they are more money.  Regular oils don't break down until 270F - there's some serious issues if that's a factor with a lathe .  It seems a topic full of hyperbole and little expertise; there's one horology oil report claiming synthetic oils don't contain hydrocarbons!   What nonsense..  Multiweight oil are designed for internal combustion engines where there's a big temperature swing.  The low initial viscosity helps get oil pressure built up quickly and makes cold cranking easier.  But the engine quickly gets up 220F or so and the oil operates at its high viscosity (oil viscosity is determined at a set temp, i.e. an oil of X viscosity means its X at 40C, it will have a very different viscosity at 110C).  Your lathe just doesn't go through the same temp swings, say -40 to +220 n the dead of winter so I don't see how a multigrade makes any sense....except maybe because is readily available? In general with machines, motor oil is really frowned on because of the additives and detergents.  They're are needed do deal with combustion, but not wanted in a gearbox/bearing bath.  Watchmakers lathes are a total loss system so these objections I don't think matter much, but its worth mentioning in the context of machine tools and oils. With a 0W20 run a low temps, you're really only going to see the "0".   The zero isn't really zero, its just small, maybe the equivalent to ISO 3 or maybe 4. ( 0 Viscosity is superfluidity, liquid helium laboratory stuff).  So what really matters?  That its a clean mineral oil (i.e. hydraulic oil) and of the right viscosity (singular) So that's the real concern I had, Is ISO 3 or 4 enough?   I'd have guessed no, but maybe.   Most of these lathes don't come with a viscosity recommendation.  Clock oils often recommended are afaik much higher than 3-4 but (snake?) oil marketing, while full of lofty claims, rarely even states the viscosity!   .  I suppose it can be overthought, these lathes seem to easily last 100 years with whatever is put into them,.  So long as the oil is thick enough to keep the parts separate at speed, its thick enough.  Still, i think synthetic and multigrade oils in a plan bearing are, well, just not required.  
    • Thank you Mark that is very helpful.
    • 1970A 200ft Diver just in - missing crown and elapsed time ring. First steps in the restore. Note the Timex caseback tool. The movments began to run on windup but this will still go with a full cleaning and oiling. More to come - IMG_0520.MOV
×
×
  • Create New...