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    • Thanks for the welcome folks.  I'm in the SF bay area, California. I'm not a big fan of eBay so I think I'll just continue to scout the thrift shops for a pocket watch or even clock. Was also my thought a larger movement should be my first go.  
    • Hello Rexxus. i too started on pocket watches and started winding by hand.  i understand most professionals, of which I am NOT one, consider it bad practice.  However, what works, works! i stopped doing it by hand simply because it hurt my fingers to do so and I had been slapped in the face 137 times too often by particularly cheeky springs.  I bought the model in you picture years ago and love it.  There are two main drawbacks IMHO.  1. As nickelsilver suggests, the older ones tend to be work, particularly in the material that grips the spring in the center.  Thus it can slip quite often.  2. This model nay has one arbor size.  That means if you work on smaller movements with smaller springs, you may bend the center out of shape or even break it.  In the case of wrist watches and smaller sprinted movements, it won’t fit at all.   you can buy new winders one arbor at a time and build your set to your needs.  They are a bit more expensive per arbor than a set, but if you don’t need a complete set, you save money and get the right tool.  I must admit to coveting Marks Bergeon set in his videos even though I will NEVER need all those sizes.   best of luck and do reach out with pocket watch questions and suggestions.  I love to compare experiences.
    • You need to sort this out, it is too far away from the collet, try to remove the kinks.    This is the type of tweezers.  Dumont® 00 Carbon Steel Polished Tweezers To Curve Breguet Hairsprings
    • Congratulations. 
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