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    • By grh215
      Hello everyone. I have a really sad story and I am a complete amateur. I am a machinist for a living so I thought I would give a crack at making a frankenwatch, however it did not go as planned and now I have a movement with subdials that don’t work and a whole lot of parts and money invested and I don’t know what to do. I need the help of a professional. The donor movement was a NOS, new old stock, and was running perfectly, however I messed up almost everything attempting to make this watch. I will happily ship all of the parts needed to complete this watch and pay for any repair that need to be made and for the return shipping. I need the help of a professional how can repair and assemble the watch with the parts and return it to me. I will pay for everything, the labor, replacement parts, return shipping, I just need someone’s help. 
      Details about the project: 
      movement: valjoux 7733
      dial: vintage NOS angelus chronograph dial
      case: custom machined case 
      crystal: plexiglass




    • By IOB
      I have a UG Tri-Compax from the 1950s or 60s (Calibre 281): The chronograph (centre) seconds hand can’t turn past 58.5 seconds and the whole watch stops ticking/working (nothing moving/turning in the movement). However, when the reset pusher (4 o’clock) is kept pressed, it enables the seconds hand and watch to move/tick again. The reset pusher is released when the chrono seconds hand reaches 60: the watch resumes ticking and the hands move until the chrono seconds hand reaches 58.5s again. The process is repeated.
       
      It has been noticed that if the watch is held face down then the reset pusher “procedure” doesn’t always work (i.e. the watch does not resume ticking/moving). It’s usually necessary to turn the watch over and try to press the pusher a few times in order to make the seconds hands move again.
       
      The 30-minute sub-dial at 3 o’clock has stopped working, too.
       
      If the chrono is not activated, then the watch seems to run properly.
       
      What do you think is the problem?
       
      Thanks for your insight!
    • By Usluyan
      Hello, everybody.
      I wanted to share my restoration stories that I have done for a long time and thrown into my archive. First I discussed the Atomic Mars 71 Brand using Valjoux 7734.
       
      As it was seen, scratch and dial is broken. To begin with, I tried to brush the Case as Brushed and make it the first day. If it is decorated, I polished and re-painted the indexes (with acrylic paint). I usually do this in three layers so that the paint is not deleted in a short time.
      I replaced the case buttons and tubes with aftermarket buttons.
      Since the condition of the dial was in very poor condition, I had it re-painted. The quality is not so good. In Turkey, unfortunately, not doing the job well.
      Caliber 7734 (Valjoux) is a special and robust mechanism for me. With good maintenance and lubrication, you can reduce deflection values up to 3-4 seconds per day. I added a short timelapse video about it :)
      As a result, such a result came before us.
      Thank you
      Taskin
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKH6yTKUfpM
       









    • By jackie01
      Hello guys,
      I want to show you my lately restoration project. This time it was a Seiko 7015-8000 with blue dial. Watch came to me in very poor condition. As you can see on photos the case was scratchty, crystal was totaly tarnished with deep scratches. Everywhere was dirt, gunk and mud...yuck. Movement was running and stopping with very low amplitude. After opened the caseback I wasn't suprised - it looked like as case - dirt and signs of wear. Rotor was loose and fall out the case. When I take off the crystall I saw dial which had faded Seiko logo, some scratches and hands which lost their lume.
       














       
      Next step was strip down the movement - everywhere dirt and dry old oil. Time to cleaning bath

       







       
      Look at this - it's my temporary balance wheel stand - I suspect that from temporary it will be permanent. It does job well.
       

       
      After cleaning it's time to assembly movement. Now it looks better - maybe not pristine but clean and shiny. New oil here and there and movement starts to run. Now it's time for bench testing before install it to the case.
       





       
       
      Meanwhile I took care of the case, dial and hands. Case got some polishing work - not to much cause I didn't want to loose the sharpness of edges. That is effect:
       





      Dial and hands got new lume - I am not perfect in this work but I still learn to do this. Additional the seconds hand was repainted to orange color. I didn't change the crystall but i just polished it with waterpaper and on the end polish paste. Effect suprissed me. Time for the  pleasant work - putting this all pieces together into the watch.
       







       

      VID_20190927_195610.mp4
       
    • By jackie01
      Hello,
      I started new project - Citizen 67-9119. It's seventies chronograph based on 8110A movement. Watch came to me as "fully working in great condition" As you can see there isn't crystal. The one which was here had chip and wasn't set properly in bezel so when i turned the watch it fall on the floor and broke. As you can see dial is in quite good condition, only it needs to be relumed. Hands needs to be repainted and relumed too. Movement works well but it is too speedy (  +3 min/24h). Chrono buttons work properly, only the hour counter stops at "3h" position so I must to take a look here. I striped down the watch and disassembled movement. There was some much oil everywhere so the cleaning is required. 















       
       
       
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    • Hi i found this watch in second hand shop and would like to repair it. The hands are moving but not able to open the case. Also the watch is not working. If anyone knows how to open it please let me know.    I am new to this and collecting vintage watches   Raj
    • I think @oldhippy is right.   From wrestling with hairsprings this is one of the trickiest repairs to do, and when doing it one whish one saved the previous discarded part in the “good to have in the future box”. When it comes to replacing the teeth the donor piece has to come from a wheel not only with the same diameter but also the same type of teeth and depth on them, this is so you will get the correct amount of freedom for the wheels to rotate in a correct way. Even small differences like these ones will make the wheels not to run correctly in the length.   Another thing to consider is how to put the new piece in place. One should avoid making a rectangular shape to fit with and instead make a “dove tail” shape with a precision triangular file. Since the teeth on the wheel is subjected to lateral driving pressures a rectangular shape will eventually cause it to wriggle free and fall out, the solder hasn’t a very good mechanical resistance. This is just some small tips and tricks to think of when repairing wheels.
    • Uh ha this is more specific explanation Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    • Hello, new member here from the Midlands. I've been a keen watch collector for some time and I like to wear a nice watch and have a small collection of modern watches. Then a few months ago I started looking at vintage watches and bought a couple, one specifically for my birth year (1972). Then.... this happened! I became a casualty of Covid and I have been made redundant. So with plenty of time on my hands and the need to keep myself mentally active i've decided to engage in the hobby further. I don't have transferable skills directly from my career but I am willing to give this a shot and see where it takes me. I ordered the equipment required to get started and completed Levels 1&2 of Mark's courses. My first major frustration was when removing the balance end stone the shock spring some how didn't hinge and came out, I picked it up with the tweezers and away it flew! So after an hour (or 6 ) looking for the spring and trying to find one to order I felt quite demoralised and gave up looking. The following morning whilst having a coffee at my work station I could not believe my luck, there it was blending into the work top. So all ended well this time but a real test/realisation for me as I embark on this journey. I've now started practising and yesterday dismantled my first project, which appears to have gone well with no flying parts... but there is a date complication so will be a new challenge in reassembly. I've added a little more equipment and today I should take delivery of a watch cleaning machine (without a manual ). Happy to be here and look forward to learning more and progressing my skills.
    • Hmmm well durability isn't exactly what people normally associate with gold, unless you're talking about its reactivity resistance so it doesn't tarnish for no reason.  The reason why your hands turn color has probably more to do with when you "gave friction" with the sand paper, it wore through the surface plating and exposed the yellow brass underneath. Not a problem if dealing with solid white-gold like in Rolex or anything that's not had a surface treatment of some kind.
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