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ajdo

Better tools you wish you had purchases as a newbie ?

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Hi All,

Thought I would start a new topic and ask this hindsight question:

What “better” quality tools (Brand and model) you wish you had purchased before going for lesser quality as a newbie ?

 

Thank you... AJ

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2 hours ago, ajdo said:

Hi All,

Thought I would start a new topic and ask this hindsight question:

What “better” quality tools (Brand and model) you wish you had purchased before going for lesser quality as a newbie ?

 

Thank you... AJ

Hi ajdo,

A quality screwdriver set and quality tweezers, I regretted not getting them from the beginning, I broke some parts with cheap screwdriver set, what I got is:

Bergeon 30081-A10 Stainless Steel Screwdriver Set with Case
Ideal-Tek Swiss Made Stainless Steel Tweezers Tip Style:#1
Ideal-Tek Swiss Made Stainless Steel Tweezers Tip Style:#5
Ideal-Tek Swiss Made Stainless Steel Tweezers Tip Style:#7
Peer Swiss Made Brass Tweezer AM Style

These are the tools you will use the most, it's worth it to get quality tools.

Darak

 

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Much appreciated Darak. Your experience and detailed information with certainly help me and other shorten their tools research learning curve. Keeping it simpler.

AJ

 

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With quality tools, you also want a place with quality reputation. 

 

all of the tools mentioned are available on www.esslinger.com  (links below) with lots more too! They always ship same day, and have items in stock. I like dumont tweezers.

 

https://www.esslinger.com/bergeon-30081-a10-mini-watchmakers-stainless-steel-screwdriver-set-with-case/

https://www.esslinger.com/swiss-made-ideal-tek-stainless-steel-tweezers/

https://www.esslinger.com/peer-swiss-made-brass-tweezer-am-style/

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Tweezers, definitely for me. It’s that infinitesimally small blink of an eye it takes, for the KIF spring you thought was securely held in your El-cheapo tweezers, to magically vanish and travel into another time and dimension in space, is all the time it takes you to realise that you should have spent much more on a good set of tweezers, and then learn how to look after them.

I use Dumont Dumoxel, No’s 3, 5 and a 1AM in brass. Expensive, but you’ll only buy them once.

Edited by Moose

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@sean1996 : “With quality tools, you also want a place with quality reputation.”

Excellent point, “quality & reputation” I think should be at the for-front of any hobby and business. Thank you for sharing :thumbsu:

@Moose : Hahaha! Nothing like real life experience story to drive one’s point home :) 

It seems screwdrivers, tweezers and loupe quality - from another post, are essencials. Quality/price point from brands mentioned seem to be in similar ball park. 

***Any other necessary items, anyone would recommend based on good or bad past experiences ?

AJ

 

 

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56 minutes ago, ajdo said:

@sean1996 : “With quality tools, you also want a place with quality reputation.”

Excellent point, “quality & reputation” I think should be at the for-front of any hobby and business. Thank you for sharing :thumbsu:

@Moose : Hahaha! Nothing like real life experience story to drive one’s point home :) 

It seems screwdrivers, tweezers and loupe quality - from another post, are essencials. Quality/price point from brands mentioned seem to be in similar ball park. 

***Any other necessary items, anyone would recommend based on good or bad past experiences ?

AJ

 

 

Hi ajdo,

Yes, I also have very good experience with Esslinger, spent almost $1,000 on them, usually they have a good price, but still, look around if you can.

Darak

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Was ready to purchase Dumont brass tweezers but could not find any on Esslinger website or anywhete else for that matter. Do not want to go via Bay or Azon, too much fake items these days

First time I ever have a hard time buying anything online on this side on the pond.

I may have to order on CousinsUK unless someone has a suggestion.

Thank you... AJ 

 

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your location isn't shown - you're in North America?  Try Perrin in Toronto, specialists and good to deal with.   Their site is ok, but I think is only a fraction of what they sell so I usually call or email

Edited by measuretwice

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1 hour ago, ajdo said:

 

Was ready to purchase Dumont brass tweezers but could not find any on Esslinger website or anywhete else for that matter. Do not want to go via Bay or Azon, too much fake items these days

First time I ever have a hard time buying anything online on this side on the pond.

I may have to order on CousinsUK unless someone has a suggestion.

Thank you... AJ 

 

Hi ajdo,

 

Here you go.

 

https://www.esslinger.com/search.php?search_query=dumont&section=product

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2 minutes ago, ajdo said:

Hahaha! Yes, I used their search tool as well but could not find “brass” Dumont tweezers :)

AJ

Hi ajdo,

Oh, that's maybe why I go for the other one.

Darak

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I appreciate the help Darak. Called a few places and all tried to sale me other materials or different brands. Not sure why Brass Dumont tweezers are so hard to find on this side of the world. 

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2 hours ago, Khan said:

Hi Ajdo.

I use following from Bergeon which is the money worth and prevent you from sweating. 

https://www.esslinger.com/bergeon-7767-f-stainless-steel-spring-bar-tool/

https://www.esslinger.com/bergeon-7403-swiss-case-knife-2-blade/

 

 

Hi Khan,

Good point, how can I forgot this very important tool, yes, a Bergeon spring bar tool, this is the first nice tool I got from Bergeon, this is the most used tool so far, I got the 6767-F model, I think it just has a different handle, I glad I got this one, recommended by TGV from the Urben Gentry too, the Bergeon one is pure quality as usual, the fork tip is nicely made, and the posh pin tip has a concaved canter, you can't imagine what the different that concaved canter do, it grips the spring bar nicely, I can use it every time with full confidence it will not slip and scratched the case or lug.

On the other hand, a nice case opening tool is not that useful for me, I don't buy watches with no screw down case back, I just use the one from my cheap watch kit.

 

https://www.esslinger.com/bergeon-6767-f-watch-band-tool-swiss-spring-bar-tool/

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Hello Darak

Yes, the spring bar tool may be one of best starting gifts you can give yourself. Buy a larger fork 6767-A as replacement end as well and you all set. Description in previous link. 

As long as the low budget case knife is not sharpened, it will be fine. The jaxa openers are expensive, but a middle range screw down opener will hopefully be less rocking when turning. It's mostly a challenge when back is immensely stuck. The rest is practice and a deep breath.

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I agree about tweezers being the most important tool to invest on, and then screwdrivers. I use Dumont and Bergeon respectively,

My next best buy was a visor, one of those loupes that you wear on your head. After trying different kind of table loupes this is the best option for me. Also it helps to protect your eyes if you are going to get a mainspring out of the barrel. A microscope would be great too to inspect the parts before and after cleaning, and the pivots etc. but I do not have one.

And my next buy will be a timegrapher. You cannot be without one if you want to enjoy this hobby, IMHO.

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Good quality loupes.

I bought 2 cheap ones at first, one real cheap off ebay and the other Anchor brand.

The ebay one was so bad that I had dropped it in the bin within 2 minutes on taking it out of its packing.

The anchor one sits besides my computer now and is sometimes used to magnify non watch related items.

All 3 loupes I now use are Bergeon ones. I recommend getting the ones with the slot in them to stop them fogging up.

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1 hour ago, aac58 said:

I agree about tweezers being the most important tool to invest on, and then screwdrivers. I use Dumont and Bergeon respectively,

My next best buy was a visor, one of those loupes that you wear on your head. After trying different kind of table loupes this is the best option for me. Also it helps to protect your eyes if you are going to get a mainspring out of the barrel. A microscope would be great too to inspect the parts before and after cleaning, and the pivots etc. but I do not have one.

And my next buy will be a timegrapher. You cannot be without one if you want to enjoy this hobby, IMHO.

@aac58 

Although I think I will get ASCO/Bergeon/Horotec eye loupes, the head band loupe could be a practical tool. Something I just remembered about head band I used in the past, after an extended period of time they make your forehead sweat. Maybe  the one’s I had were the cheap type. 

I also though my sister being a dentist uses the small biancular type loupes. Will have to ask her brand and model she uses. They look like these:

https://www.esslinger.com/deluxe-galilean-loupe-3-5x-11-15/

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I bought a cheap band loupe and I am quite happy with it, I don't know the brand and I haven't it here to check. And yes it make my forehead sweat.

A well known brand for these kind of loupes is Optivisor, but I haven't tried it.

My sister is a dentist too. The loupes they use are in the range of several thousands euros. I guess that looking through them must be a different kind of experience :blink:

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Lol! :) Yes I ask and they are very expensive. Also mentioned they are heavy, hurt and dig in the nose bridge. I’ll stick with loupes and look into Optivisor. Looking at pics, Optivisor does have openings on the forehead strap. I suppose everything has it’s pros and cons.

AJ

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