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Phil1

GUCCI 9000M Project

Question

I have a Gucci 9000M which is currently in bits! I want to put it back together but there are a few parts missing.
I am trying to do this with as little expense as possible.
Does anyone know of anywhere that I can buy second hand parts or better still buy a defunct donor?  

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Albeit it was in the wrong section, you've posted this already:

 

Unfortunately as answered already is not like there is a secret place for fashion watches specific spare parts.

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I'm not expecting some "Magic Circle" type revelation. I was simply asking for advice as this is my first project and a little advice would help a lot. Naively, I have always thought that a forum is a place of public discussion and extending one's wisdom to others. In your case Sanctum may be a more appropriate word.

I do apologise for the repetition of my enquiry but I simply forgot about my earlier posting. Unlike you who disdainfully referred to the "Fashion Watch" in both of your replies, despite already being aware of the sentimental value.

I think an apology is most certainly in order on this occasion.

I eagerly await your response.       

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Hi Phil    you could try cousins uk  or gleave &co  or AG Thomas, for parts ,  to source a donor the best place is ebay you may be able to find a nonworker (spare or repair). cousins and gleave& co have the tech sheets available to down load for reference. good luck in you quest,

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More likely than not you’ll need to resort to eBay to see if you can scare up a donor for the parts you need. A quick look turns up several and completed auctions seem to suggest they are selling for as little as $50.

 

As jdm suggested this is a fashion house who’ve stuck their name on a watch, not an actual watch company and as such there really may not be a lot of resources to find parts specific to the model short of scrounging on eBay.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

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Is Gucci 9000 M a caliber No?       Have you shown a pic of the movement, my internet wont always open pix ?   I have couple of quartz movements destined to become donors, all runing but not complete.

 

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We need/you need the calibre of the watch movement to do a search. Many watch makers use ETA movements its just the case that is different. With Quartz very often it is quicker and more cost effective to replace the the whole movement with new.

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Looking at the original posting there are a number of problems you have: 1) missing bezel; 2) missing movement holder; 3) missing hour marker on the dial.

The brand or maker is relatively irrelevant here ... getting individual  parts for any watch can be difficult since there is no central repository or service for this. As other posters have said your best bet is usually to keep an eye out on ebay for what you need ... either a whole watch to 'cannibalise' what you need from or the  individual parts you need. Ironically the part that actually marks time (the movement) can usually be found more readily since whole movements can be purchased for these type of watches!

A quick look on ebay and there is the bezel available (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-Gucci-Replacement-Bezel-9000-M/233126585935?hash=item36476d664f:g:M3IAAOSwPYZU9SMG) ... yippee! Ah ... but it'll cost you around £54 (item plus postage).

On better news for 2 you can relatively easily get generic movement holders. Your ETA 955.412 movement classes as a 10.5 ligne size so you need that size of holder. You can look out for a variety on ebay or similar. For the hour marker you can often see joblots of second hand dials on ebay and you could look out for something where you can take one off (assuming you can't locate a whole dial). Or, if you're the creative type you could even make one from some polished brass.

I guess a lot of this is going to boil down to value or watch and cost to fix all the ailments ... versus its sentimental value.

Another suggestion if you're trying to do this all on a limited budget is to consider some kind of hybrid solution e.g. buy a second hand alternative case or watch with bezel that looks similar ... but use the original dial etc. plus strap with this. You have the essence of the original watch for its sentimental value but at a reasonable cost. Just an idea!

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