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AP1875

No adjustment left on beat corrector

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I'm wanting to regulate this movement. Usually I'd start with the beat corrector and when that's 0 or 0.1 max I'd move onto playing around with the rate in a few positions. However I've been stopped in my tracks because the beat error here is 0.5 and there is no more adjustment left. 

Just wondering what my next move should be? 

20190607_190146.jpg

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This is the time when you need to adjust the hairspring. It’s the next level up in complexity as you have to remove it, put the wheel on with the pin in the middle of the way and mark the spot on the wheel where the pin is located while the impulse jewel is right between the safety banks.

Thought to describe without pics! Maybe others will have images or a shortcut?

Good luck!




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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0.5ms beat error is a perfectly acceptable value and will not influence accuracy. 

If you don't believe that, regulate to the best positions average, wear the watch few days and let us know. 

Unless you are interested in learning how the hairspring collett is adjusted, which is a pretty delicate task, I would not recommend you try that on a balance cock with movable stud arm. 

Edited by jdm

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15 hours ago, AP1875 said:

20190607_190146.jpg

There is however an issue with the pattern above. If the jump down repeats that's not a good sign, check if it  happens with a fixed period?
For a general reference I've the attached a brief guide. Only the first few pages are of interest, much better texts must exist.

 

Witschi Training Course.pdf

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37 minutes ago, jdm said:

There is however an issue with the pattern above. If the jump down repeats that's not a good sign, check if it  happens with a fixed period?
For a general reference I've the attached a brief guide. Only the first few pages are of interest, much better texts must exist.

 

Witschi Training Course.pdf 4.65 MB · 0 downloads

Thanks for sharing your knowledge. I uploaded a video. Probably the best way for me to show the pattern. What are your thoughts? Taking more notice of the pattern rather than the figures for beat error it doesnt look quite right.

I've checked all the parts when I took it apart, there isnt any damage to the escapement. Any ideas how to trace the fault and rectify it? 

I will download the manual now thanks. 

 

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32 minutes ago, AP1875 said:

Probably the best way for me to show the pattern. What are your thoughts?

All is good with your watch. I'm so embarrassed, I posted with the brain disconnected, that is just the progress gap in your picture.

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