Jump to content
  • 0
JMijatovic

Watch dial help for a student

Question

Hello, I am sorry for bothering you all and this is my first time on this forum so sorry if I have done something in advance. 

I have been tasked with a school project to innovate a product, I have chosen to develop a watch for the blind with my own innovations and designs. I am currently within the works of developing my own dial and strap however I come to the predicament of not understanding how I am able to solve my dial issue. My whole design revolves around the glass protector or guard being lifted by the user's finger and for them to feel around dial freely thus allowing for them to feel the time. However, I am attempting to find myself a method of how I am able to make the hands not move on the dial yet be adjusted by the crown on the side of the watch. 

 

Please and all help will be kindly and greatly Appreciated. 

Kind regards 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

17 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum.

You could google watches for the blind and take a look at some images, that would give you some idea. There are also watches that work on batteries, you press a button and it tells you the time, no hands needed. Don't forget if you use numbers or figures they need to be razed.     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

There are many designs of watches for the blind most of the old mechanical watches where already using the method you describe a glass and bezel that lifted out of the way and allowed the user to feel the position of the hands in relation to the raised numerals on the dial they where fitted with hands that where far more robust than on a normal watch. I do however have a pocket watch from around 1880 that uses a different method in that it has a pin at each hour this pin is either raised or lowered so at 10' o'clock the pin at that hour is raised at eleven o'clock the pin drops and the 11 o'clock pin raises via means of a spring loaded disc under the dial, the raising and lowering of pins is instantaneous on each hour, this means that only one hand is needed for the minutes.

I think that most Blind people now would have a quartz talking watch which of course would not use hands.

There are plenty of examples of watches for the blind on the web, good luck with your project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Watches for the blind have been around for a long time. The traditional system you mention (where the watch user will open the front and gently feel the position of the hands) through to more modern versions and ones that can do a lot more than tell the time (check out the Dot Watch!).

I guess things will come down to the actual nature of your project and how literal the term 'innovative' is!  The system you're pursuing is not new ... although I expect you have some snazzy ideas up your sleeves.

If you continue to go with this then let me answer your main query of how you are "able to make the hands not move on the dial". This should not be a problem; the traditional system watches are effectively standard watch movements. This means the watch user can only alter the hand positions when pulling the crown out to put the movement in a setting position and then turning the crown. With the crown in the normal pushed in 'non setting' position the hands do not move by touch alone. [The watch user must still be gentle when using the watch however as hands are friction fitted so could still be compromised with very rough handling].

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Alright..take a look at this old "digital " alarm clock. It has three rotating drums .hours.tens and minutes. Maybe a standard watch movement could be modified  to do this? Turned on it's side? The crown would be on the face of the watch.the drums could have raised numbers.all protected by a hinged lid..of course if you actually have to make one..that could be tough.but if it is just a concept..I think it could work

IMAG0698.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Go to any electronic forum, ask for advice and what forum to go to for your inquiry. You will be refered to the right forum. Folks there are generally working on their Phd and are well capable of recommending the right hardware, you may get by, with inexpensive ones like ADRIANO WAY, ask for help on programming it, make a talking watch that tells time and takes some basic commands.like wake me up, remind me to go to work, etc. 

Good luck pal.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Correction to my post,   ARDUINO .

ARDUINO is an inexpensive microprocessor which can be shrinkified.

I think the voice synthesizers and all you may need are readily available.

Ask the experts there.

Regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

OR , if you want to keep it mechanical, Maybe you need a new way of telling time.  If you were to go with a four digit odometer type read out. May I suggest the following.

 

First digit, The quarter of the day.A totally sightless person might lose track of whether it is AM or PM.

So, 1 would be 00:00 through 05:59, 2 would be 06:00 through 11:59, 3 would be 12:00 through 17:59 , 4 would be 18:00 through 23:59

Second digit,  The hour within that quarter. 

Third digit  , The the tens digit of the minutes within the hour.

fourth digit, the minute rounded off to an even number. 

This way the numbers on the indicators could be larger. while keeping accuracy acceptable.

A readout of 1000 would be midnight.

A readout of 2212 would be  8:12 AM

A readout of 3522 would be  would be 5:22 PM 

A readout of 4246 would be 8:46 PM 

 

Does This make any sense to anybody?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Mimic nature, bats scans surroundings by ultrasound and fly with incredible precision. 

The technology to scan surroundings is already out there guiding driverless vehicles.

Why not guide a blind humankind. The watch can tell, what a guide dog can,t put in English,

If ambitious to help, ideas are endless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Not only are talking watches a thing, but there are companies that specialize in selling these, and other aids to the blind.

I recently picked up and restored a couple of talking watches from this company.

https://www.cobolt.co.uk/categories/category/clocks-and-watches

I posted about them here on the forum here.

Take a look at the Cobalt site, it might give you some inspiration.

Edited by AndyHull

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Thank you all for your considerations, i will be incorporating these notions within my project and creation phase. I live in Australia and wasn't checking this i am very sorry. 

 

I understand that this design has been created however my mind isnt smart enough to create something to innovative that would change the world but honestly, i am so happy i had this forum you had all helped me. I will be designing my own watch face and creating which is where i will be raising the numbers and braile sizing. I had an idea to create a bezel that twists, this has been created however i was gonna develop mine act more as a fidget spinner. As a method to reduce stress or anxiety for the consumer who is using it. By any chance would anyone know where i could hire a company to create the watch casing that can be opened in this fashion, or can any regular watchmaker do it? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I certainly did not want to replace the motor, as this is so very visible, all attempts at maintaining the illusion of originality would fail. A solution to the problem could only be achieved with a safer, replacement speed control, which could work with the original mains voltage motor. Fortunately, these are readily available in the form of a Pulse Width Modulated (PWM), motor speed controller circuit. These will take in the 220V incoming mains supply and provide a variable output of between 50V and the incoming supply voltage. These are well known devices and proven to work with even simple (old) motors. So, a PWM circuit was obtained (at incredibly reasonable cost), and measured up. In an attempt to at least have the "illusion" of originality, I was determined to use the original hole for the rotary speed control, as well as the original Bakelite control knob. With the shaft on the rotary potentiometer too short for this, I had to do some more metal bashing. As can be seen below, I used the old rheostat as a donor, for a short length of it's shaft, which I would mate to the new potentiometer, allowing the Bakelite knob to operate. This was cut to shape and filed to mate with the new potentiometer shaft. This was then soldered together and thus ready for installation. You can see in the photo, the size and technical comparison between the old rheostat and the new PWM controller circuit.  
    • Next up is the motor speed control. I did think long and hard about my original aim of maintaining as much originality as possible. And, there is no doubt that the original speed control rheostat was a) original and b) functional. But - as I was an electronics technician in an earlier life, and also health and safety professional in a more recent life, the safety aspects weighed heavily upon my concience. Logic played it's part as well - with the original rheostat put back into service, albeit with some hand-made guarding to keep out the fingers of the unwary, it would be safe-ish, for me to use, as long as I kept my wits about me. BUT NOT SAFE FOR ANYONE ELSE unaware of what was underneath. Only the knowledge of what lurked underneath would be keeping me safe, but anyone else might not have a second chance. As can be seen from the photo below, all of the wire on the resistors is not only unguarded, but within millimetres of the level of the base. Also, the incoming mains terminals to the rheostat are also dangerously unguarded. With today's knowledge, it is difficult to fathom how this ever could have been considered safe to use.
    • Back to the job in hand. I managed to find the cork I thought I may have had, lurking in a box under the stairs. It was the most part of an A4 sized sheet, so more than enough for my purposes - to sit the jars on whilst they are in the machine. Looking at the metal bases, I really can't be convinced if there ever was any cork or any other material for that matter there. But for me anyway, the idea of the glass jars sitting directly on the metal base just seems wrong and I would prefer some cork there as a cushion. It's about as tidy as it needs to be, given the shape of the metal webbing. I suppose I could have cut-out squares of cork, but then it would leave potential weak, unsupported areas of cork, which would likely need some form of strengthening. Anyway - this application suits me and helps the jars sit a bit more stable in their locations. Whilst I am in the vicinity, so to speak, I have also added an earth lead which will bond the chassis to the incoming mains lead, once fitted. This is visible in these photos.  
    • A little further research and then on with the show... A quick browse through patent databases, shows that one Saul Lanzetter applied for and was awarded a patent for this design of watch cleaning machine in October 1937. A brief narrative is reproduced here: Interestingly, the patent application is entitled "Improvements in apparatus for cleaning watch parts and other small parts of machinery." It may be reading too much onto this title to assume that there may have been a previous patent, pre-dating this one, as this one refers to "improvements". Also of interest, there were 2 patent applications from US companies in 1944 and 1945 which cite the Lanzetter patent, and three from Germany in 1956, 1960 and 1961 (only one of which was actually published), which also cite the Lanzetter patent as a reference. Incidentally - the two US patents refer to machines which look strikingly similar to the National Model VI-C above, and the National No 4. machine in the earlier advert, showing the four jars side by side ( this seems to be referred to as a lab machine, rather than a repair shop machine). Naturally, all patents or applications referred to above are now expired. For me anyway, I think this may clear up which watch cleaning machine may have come first (at least in this machine format anyway): The S. Lanzetter National Electric Watch Cleaning Machine, circa 1937.  
    • Impressive work. The barrel and mainspring look almost new, and the remaining pitting is no worse than some lesser movements left the factory with. I'm looking forward to the next installment.
×
×
  • Create New...