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Just stumbled over the site "No BS Watchmaking" and I'm curious if anyone of you has pulled the trigger on it and if it was any good? I find it a bit strange that there's isn't a discount (unless I missed it) if you'd want both offered courses as so much material is shared between the courses.

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59 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

Just stumbled over the site "No BS Watchmaking" and I'm curious if anyone of you has pulled the trigger on it and if it was any good? I find it a bit strange that there's isn't a discount (unless I missed it) if you'd want both offered courses as so much material is shared between the courses.

I have not personally reviewed their course content but one of my customers has contacted me and told me their content is useful. Never seen anything negative about them so it could be a good addition to your learning arsenal.

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Pricewise I must say I find it a bit hard to swallow. Anyone who's actually enrolled and can give me an opinion?

I did watch a video segment from the course on their facebook page, and to me, the instructor is speaking a bit too fast (English isn't my native language). Some words (sort of mumbling a bit) are lost on me and I just can't hear what they are. I also find it somewhat unnecessary and annoying when the instructor speaks continually and sometimes states the obvious such as "we can see this screw here", "this comes off very, very easy, OK", etc. Speaking continually takes attention away from the video images. In this respect Mark Lovick is exemplary; very precise and clear in his language (even to Swedes ;)) and isn't afraid to take long pauses from talking while demonstrating (very relieving)! And while on the topic, I have taken (and practised) all three courses on watchrepairlessons.com. Extremely good value for money IMO!

Anyway, I'm curious but hesitant to pull the trigger on the No BS Watchmaking as not even a single of the videos are available for free, and who wants to buy a pig in a poke? So, Anyone who's actually enrolled and can give me an opinion?

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On 6/5/2019 at 1:25 PM, Mark said:

I have not personally reviewed their course content but one of my customers has contacted me and told me their content is useful. Never seen anything negative about them so it could be a good addition to your learning arsenal.

Thanks! While on the topic of learning; will you be covering the tools and the how-to of reassembling the hairspring collet and roller to the balance staff in a future episode on watchrepairlessons.com?

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1 hour ago, sean1996 said:

I know there is a book with a similar title to that... 100+ No BS Watch Tips For Watch Enthusiasts and Salespeople

Link: https://www.esslinger.com/100-no-bs-watch-tips-for-watch-enthusiasts-salespeople-by-anthony-l/

Yes, the same person (if I got it right) behind the nobswatchmaker.com site and the book.

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9 hours ago, AP1875 said:

One thing that i really can't get on with (apart from the price) is this guy keeps himself completely anonymous. Why can't he reveal himself? 

 

I agree! It could be that he is not the person he claims to be. His voice and attitude sound very young. I associate the voice and choice of words (like "There's a shit ton more.") with someone in his twenties.  Another indicator of a young person is all the quotes of wise sayings. I used to be into wise sayings when I was young and still forming myself. The story about being forced to work with watches from the age of 12, and hate it, sounds somewhat strained. Also, he claims to have been trained by all luxury brand companies.

"I've been trained by Rolex, Omega, Breitling, Jaeger-LeCoultre, and much more."
"I've gone on to learn watchmaking formally, attend many brand trainings, and earned certifications under my belt."

If I were him I would proudly have displayed at least some of my certificates.

My guess is that this could be a very intelligent, gifted and "street smart" guy who found a way to make money by slipping a bit on the truth. Marketing seems to be a major interest in him.

Well, I'm not afraid to show my certificates. I've earned them (with a margin) and I'm proud of them! ;)

 

IMG_8108.JPG

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Thanks! While on the topic of learning; will you be covering the tools and the how-to of reassembling the hairspring collet and roller to the balance staff in a future episode on watchrepairlessons.com?
I will. Thanks for the suggestion.

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

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If you look at all the marketing at least what we can see a heck of a lot of effort is put into this. But as the question was raised above it does make you wonder why we just get a first name? My first impression when I see something like this is to run away and assume it's a scam.

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Just looked at this video. I don't like the way he handles the watch and the tools, slipping around and dropping them on the table and making a lot of noise. I'm getting the impression he's trying to dazzle me by being quick n' slick. It reminds me more of a stressed out car mechanic than a passionate watch repairer. I'm still curious though, but it's beginning to wear off...

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1 hour ago, VWatchie said:

Just looked at this video. I don't like the way he handles the watch and the tools, slipping around and dropping them on the table and making a lot of noise. I'm getting the impression he's trying to dazzle me by being quick n' slick. It reminds me more of a stressed out car mechanic than a passionate watch repairer. I'm still curious though, but it's beginning to wear off.

No I think you're showing a poor attitude you'd have to keep up that enthusiasm and purchase one of these courses. That's because we would like the honest truth from somebody with experience as to what they think. A lot of times when newbies take courses like this there so dazzled and so impressed we don't get a real proper feel. 

 

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