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Omega Geneve 1970’s automatic watch stopped working after popping off the glass

Question

I was following this video to pop out the glass on my Geneva watch.

 

I wanted to pop out the glass to adjust the calendar frame. However, after popping out the glass,  the automatic watch stopped working. Could it be possible that the pressure of air from the syringe damage something? I appreciate if anyone can suggest possible problems. Below is my watch.

Thank you in advance.

 

 

20CCEAF0-1CF1-456A-A71D-4064D7024DE9.jpeg

84CB9840-FBD7-48E7-9299-45CBC3B4DC5D.jpeg

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My guess is that the dial lifted slightly and this has taken the pressure off the dial washer underneath, allowing things to get loose and the hands to stop turning. However this is only a guess.  Proceed with caution. Check to see if the dial feet screws are loose. Check to see if you can move the hands with the crown.

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Call me paranoid but I would not use the air blowing method on any watch (unless it had no small moving parts but what watch has that, right?).

I'd rather just use the claw tool to remove teh crystal.

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32 minutes ago, Chopin said:

Call me paranoid but I would not use the air blowing method on any watch (unless it had no small moving parts but what watch has that, right?). I'd rather just use the claw tool to remove teh crystal.

Some crystals, like the one that is in the video and owned by the OP have absolutely no lip to grab with a lifter. So there is no other choice. Remember that our Mark is not in the business of teaching how to damage watches, but exactly the opposite.

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You could try the carpet tape trick with that type of glass. It is not without its hazards mind you. I can see there is a potential to launch the watch and/or the crystal in to orbit, or end up with insanely sticky goop in places it really aught not to be, but I suspect it would work.

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4 hours ago, AndyHull said:

You could try the carpet tape trick with that type of glass.

There are also suction cups specially made for this. I've never seen a report about their effectiveness.

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