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bodymassagewatch

Timex M25 caliber handwound movement won't wind

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The watch I've got has an M25 movement (from what i could see in the model #) and the issue is that, in the winding position, the crown will now wind. It will spin in reverse, and i can pull it out to the time setting position and it sets the time no problem. So something is "stuck" inside. Any ideas as to what it could be?

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4 hours ago, bodymassagewatch said:

The watch I've got has an M25 movement (from what i could see in the model #) and the issue is that, in the winding position, the crown will now wind. It will spin in reverse, and i can pull it out to the time setting position and it sets the time no problem. So something is "stuck" inside. Any ideas as to what it could be?

15582109824151173945785242358289.jpg

I suspect it is fully wound, and simply doesn't run. Probably in need of a clean.

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Yes fully wound but won't run  due to dirt or lack of lubrication, run it immersed in naphtha. Dial and hands removed. That ought to clean out the dirt and old sludge.Then run it again if the fluid is dirty. let dry ,lubricate sparingly pay attention to the hairspring when doing so the watch wont run if it is not completely dry. 

Edited by yankeedog
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1 hour ago, yankeedog said:

Yes fully wound but won't run  due to dirt or lack of lubrication, run it immersed in naphtha. Dial and hands removed. That ought to clean out the dirt and old sludge.Then run it again if the fluid is dirty. let dry ,lubricate sparingly pay attention to the hairspring when doing so the watch wont run if it is not completely dry. 

Ok, i will try that. Thank you!

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5 hours ago, vinn3 said:

it  sounds like the main spring is broken.

This is also a possibility.But I have noticed that a broken mainspring will usually wind forever.

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synthetic 0w20 motor oil.I have had good results with it. I have tried ATF , but it is too thin. I have tried hypoid gear oil, but it is too thick.now mind you I don't work on anything too expensive. according to the viscosity chart  0w20 and 0w30  have a thickness very similar to moebius oils used for general lubrication.

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17 minutes ago, yankeedog said:

synthetic 0w20 motor oil.I have had good results with it. I have tried ATF , but it is too thin. I have tried hypoid gear oil, but it is too thick.now mind you I don't work on anything too expensive. according to the viscosity chart  0w20 and 0w30  have a thickness very similar to moebius oils used for general lubrication.

Fantastic, I can pick that up today! Again, thanks for your help!

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12 minutes ago, Nucejoe said:

Perhaps a typo,   "  the crown will now wind , it will spin in revese. 

Please clarify.

 

I assumed ".. crown will *not* wind, (but) it will spin in reverse..."

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Oh, I misunderstood you too. Yes wound fully.

If the crowns turns in reverse dumping the wind, possible fault at the click.

Good thing you are online, to translate.:lol:

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37 minutes ago, yankeedog said:

synthetic 0w20 motor oil.I have had good results with it. I have tried ATF , but it is too thin. I have tried hypoid gear oil, but it is too thick.now mind you I don't work on anything too expensive. according to the viscosity chart  0w20 and 0w30  have a thickness very similar to moebius oils used for general lubrication.

I have a 1/2 litre of 0W30 sitting idle. I'm up for experimenting with it, so I'll pick a suitable "victim" and let you know how I get on.

Slightly off topic, I was getting nagged by the on board computer on my Volvo to put in 1/2 litre of oil (it is a diesel, and the manual calls for 0W30). Naturally nobody sells 1/2 ltr of the stuff, so you have to purchase 1ltr and since it is due a service, so the whole lot will be changed soon anyway, it is all a bit of a faff. 

The dratted vehicle doesn't even have a dipstick. The computer senses the oil level, and there is no other way of checking it,  so presumably if the sensor fails, the first thing I will know about it is when the engine explodes.

What is so difficult about checking the oil for goodness sake? I've managed in every one of the (very many) other vehicles I've ever owned or driven, but this one assumes I'm either an idiot, or a snowflake who shudders at the though of opening the bonnet (or the hood, if you live on the sunny side of the pond). 

Everything these days is over complicated by the un-necessary addition of "toys". I'm surprised the thing doesn't phone up Volvo and complain about me for ignoring its nagging for a week.

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On 5/19/2019 at 1:41 PM, yankeedog said:

Yes fully wound but won't run  due to dirt or lack of lubrication, run it immersed in naphtha. Dial and hands removed. That ought to clean out the dirt and old sludge.Then run it again if the fluid is dirty. let dry ,lubricate sparingly pay attention to the hairspring when doing so the watch wont run if it is not completely dry. 

Naptha - aka lighter fluid. Cheap and easily sourced. In the UK, I use lighter fluid from Asda or Poundland. Both worked fine on the Timex movements I've cleaned recently.  Expect to pay.. about a pound, for a small can (100ml). 

The purists will no doubt be spluttering in to their coffee about all of this talk of lighter fluid and engine oils, but they are a reasonable substitute for more specialist watch products, if you are only doing inexpensive movements at the hobby level.

If you plan on doing this for a living, or servicing a family heirloom, then I would suggest stick with the tried and tested, branded, specialist watch cleaning and lubrication products.

Edited by AndyHull

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5 hours ago, AndyHull said:

Naptha - aka lighter fluid. Cheap and easily sourced. In the UK, I use lighter fluid from Asda or Poundland. Both worked fine on the Timex movements I've cleaned recently.  Expect to pay.. about a pound, for a small can (100ml). 

The purists will no doubt be spluttering in to their coffee about all of this talk of lighter fluid and engine oils, but they are a reasonable substitute for more specialist watch products, if you are only doing inexpensive movements at the hobby level.

If you plan on doing this for a living, or servicing a family heirloom, then I would suggest stick with the tried and tested, branded, specialist watch cleaning and lubrication products.

100% agreement.As I have stated many times.Don't do this on your Rolex!

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10 hours ago, AndyHull said:

I have a 1/2 litre of 0W30 sitting idle. I'm up for experimenting with it, so I'll pick a suitable "victim" and let you know how I get on.

Slightly off topic, I was getting nagged by the on board computer on my Volvo to put in 1/2 litre of oil (it is a diesel, and the manual calls for 0W30). Naturally nobody sells 1/2 ltr of the stuff, so you have to purchase 1ltr and since it is due a service, so the whole lot will be changed soon anyway, it is all a bit of a faff. 

The dratted vehicle doesn't even have a dipstick. The computer senses the oil level, and there is no other way of checking it,  so presumably if the sensor fails, the first thing I will know about it is when the engine explodes.

What is so difficult about checking the oil for goodness sake? I've managed in every one of the (very many) other vehicles I've ever owned or driven, but this one assumes I'm either an idiot, or a snowflake who shudders at the though of opening the bonnet (or the hood, if you live on the sunny side of the pond). 

Everything these days is over complicated by the un-necessary addition of "toys". I'm surprised the thing doesn't phone up Volvo and complain about me for ignoring its nagging for a week.

Ack! People wonder why I still drive my Volvo 240 Gasoline red block.

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Motor oil? aye aye aye!!!!!  get some bearing grease too...which btw I have found in at few watches :(

if you don't want to buy a synthetic watch oil you can use a synthetic lubricant with Teflon.  I bought two pen sized tubes from Radio Shack 12 years ago and still have at least 1/3 left in each.  

and you have to by watch grease to use on the stem tubes and area where the set lever pivots. Also, just a dab where the winding gear meets the mainspring gear.  Works wonders!

Basic "Network 54 Vintage Timex Watch Forum" method 3 cleaners.  ammonia , water, lighter fluid > soak rinse soak, oil grease

 

and on a personal note - just back from cardiologist and all is going very well since heart attack 7 weeks ago.  Dropped 10 pounds so far and feeling great.  He gave me the okay to resume normal activities and can't wait to get back to the garden.   

Edited by JerseyMo

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9 minutes ago, JerseyMo said:

Motor oil? aye aye aye!!!!!  get some bearing grease too...which btw I have found in at few watches :(

if you don't want to buy a synthetic watch oil you can use a synthetic lubricant with Teflon.  I bought two pen sized tubes from Radio Shack 12 years ago and still have at least 1/3 left in each.  

and you have to by watch grease to use on the stem tubes and area where the set lever pivots. Also, just a dab where the winding gear meets the mainspring gear.  Works wonders!

Basic "Network 54 Vintage Timex Watch Forum" method 3 cleaners.  ammonia , water, lighter fluid > soak rinse soak, oil grease

 

and on a personal note - just back from cardiologist and all is going very well since heart attack 7 weeks ago.  Dropped 10 pounds so far and feeling great.  He gave me the okay to resume normal activities and can't wait to get back to the garden.   

How about Moebius 8000 oil?

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6 hours ago, JerseyMo said:

and on a personal note - just back from cardiologist and all is going very well since heart attack 7 weeks ago.  Dropped 10 pounds so far and feeling great.  He gave me the okay to resume normal activities and can't wait to get back to the garden.

Great news.:Bravo:

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On 5/22/2019 at 4:49 PM, JerseyMo said:

and on a personal note - just back from cardiologist and all is going very well since heart attack 7 weeks ago.  Dropped 10 pounds so far and feeling great.  He gave me the okay to resume normal activities and can't wait to get back to the garden  

Glad to hear you're on the mend, JerseyMo!  Stay well.

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