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bodymassagewatch

How do i know if my crystal is glued in?

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The only sure way is to remove the movement from the case and inspect. It looks like a vintage and possibly glued just a hard push and it will pop out. If the crystal has a lip you will need a crystal lift tool. It is water resistant NOT water proof so it is highly unlikely to have a tension ring crystal. 

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6 hours ago, clockboy said:

The only sure way is to remove the movement from the case and inspect. It looks like a vintage and possibly glued just a hard push and it will pop out. If the crystal has a lip you will need a crystal lift tool. It is water resistant NOT water proof so it is highly unlikely to have a tension ring crystal. 

Thanks clockboy!

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On 5/18/2019 at 9:19 AM, clockboy said:

The only sure way is to remove the movement from the case and inspect. It looks like a vintage and possibly glued just a hard push and it will pop out. If the crystal has a lip you will need a crystal lift tool. It is water resistant NOT water proof so it is highly unlikely to have a tension ring crystal. 

 

On 5/18/2019 at 2:24 PM, oldhippy said:

Try pushing it out with your fingers you will soon find out.  Just be careful. 

A faceted crystal has ..faces but not a lip. Seiko did not use glue often, and the crystal will not leave by pushing with a thumb.

Fortunately, Seiko helps watch repairers by classifying and documenting the case construction, here we have an "A" as stamped on the case back. Attached the guide. A good discussion is at https://www.plus9time.com/seiko-case-back-information

BTW, I recommend the OP to use the "Watch Repairs Help & Advice" section when it's repair question like this. One advantage is that there answers can be rated and marked as resolving.

 

1982.03 Seiko Case Servicing Guide.pdf

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1 hour ago, jdm said:

 

 

A faceted crystal has ..faces but not a lip. Seiko did not use glue often, and the crystal will not leave by pushing with a thumb.

Fortunately, Seiko helps watch repairers by classifying and documenting the case construction, here we have an "A" as stamped on the case back. Attached the guide. A good discussion is at https://www.plus9time.com/seiko-case-back-information

BTW, I recommend the OP to use the "Watch Repairs Help & Advice" section when it's repair question like this. One advantage is that there answers can be rated and marked as resolving.

 

1982.03 Seiko Case Servicing Guide.pdf 7.38 MB · 1 download

THANK YOU oldhippy, this has been very enlightening! And thank you for sharing that manual!

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10 hours ago, bodymassagewatch said:

THANK YOU oldhippy, this has been very enlightening! 

JDM.. Hehe.. 

To appreciate others you can use the like button on the bottom right of any posting. 

Edited by jdm

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