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GregC

Tudor Princess

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Wounder if the princess had the same as the prince, it had an ETA 2483. If you move the rotor to the other side one can see what ETA movement it is probably an ETA 2555.

Edited by HSL

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I agree with HSL that it does look like a movement made by ETA. I couldn't find the one when I looked on Dr. Ranfft's site. Interestingly, both the 2483 and 2555 are not listed there. I had looked in that general area. The reverser wheels look like those on ETAs anyway. Good luck.

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Obviously Dr RANFFT missed some out but if you have to look at ETA 2451 there he has it only mentioned in his remarks on the right side.

The rotor on the 2483 differs from the basemovement 2451.

The ETA 2555 was trickier to find but our friend the Watcguy had a post..
https://watchguy.co.uk/cgi-bin/library?action=show_photos&wat_id=1447

Edited by HSL

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I wonder if the 2555 is a movement made for Tudor/Rolex exclusively. It seems I have seen the 6 ball-bearing rotor on Rolex and/or Tudor movements, where the more common across other companies, like Eterna, have 5 ball-bearings. As many know Eterna uses the 5-bearing design in a trademarked logo. At least IIRC.

Note: I have little experience with Rolex and Tudor. My comments are based on observations of images, etc., not working experience with them. I have, however, worked on an Eternamatic. Screwed it up all by myself. :thumbsd: It was a very small model Eternamatic 1195r. Little bugger, it was. If I ever work on another like it, I'll replace the balance wheel earlier in the reassembly, as trying to maneuver it under the train-bridge proved disastrous.

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Sorry guys, I couldnt find the post and thought it got deleted for some reason. I looked under the balance wheel and its marked 2555.  This watch was looked at by someone else who said that the part was not available anymore.It winds and winds but doesnt run. Does the 2555 hand wind? If it does, then its probably a broken mainspring?

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Since I believe that Rolex is a company that makes it very difficult for independent watchmakers to get factory parts, and this 2555 could have proprietary parts, some parts may be tough to get. However, if it's a mainspring for an ETA model, I'd be surprised if a watchmaker couldn't find one. Perhaps there's something else wrong with it that had the watch-person tell you that the part was no longer available. I suspect you could send it to Rolex/Tudor, but it would cost a lot of money to do anything to it at all. Good luck.

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See if the reversers in selfwinder module turn as you give it manual wind. Listen for sound from barrel as wind.

Mainspring's dimensions are to be measured to find a suitable replacement for the MS. Which I am likely to have . 

 

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Have you measured the diameter of the movement?
I'm quite sure there is a replacement part out there since there were only minor changes made to these movements.
When you know the ligne one can see what movement it is based on,
Like the ETA 2483 is based on the ETA 2451R yours ETA 2555 could be based lets say on ETA 2650 (Has the same autowinding mechanism)-
For the most if the have the same base they have many interchangeble parts parts.

Edited by HSL

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So 7.75 ligne isn't that far away,  there are two base movements to Tudor Princess then, the ETA 2650 and the ETA 2551R by the looks put side by side I would say 2551R. Both has parts available.
image.png.ede87ec7c9adc6c6c50252e5b3bb2ef1.png

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