Jump to content
Tmuir

I put away my cartridge razor

Recommended Posts

No,

I'm not growing a beard, I'm not a fan of the throw away society in general, not just the latest trend of smart watches that cost a fortune and will be in the bin in 3 years time, so following that line I have decided to use double edged safety razors, I'm not quite brave enough to go the whole hog and get a straight edge razor, but did buy myself a solid stainless steel double edged razor from a Canadian based company that manufactures them in the USA, which should outlast me.

After using cartridge razors to shave for 30 years and just 5 days ago switching to a DE razor I've finally realised that shaving with one of these razors is an art-form and at the moment I'm clearly not an artist. :D

I'm guessing it will be a few more weeks until I give myself as good a shave as I did with my old cartridge razor, but atleast I'm still managing to shave without cutting myself and in the long run will be throwing out a less plastic and saving myself some money.

Is there anyone else here crazy (or stupid) enough to go back to a double edged safety razor, or even more mad to use a straight edge razor (Cut throat)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think they called it the "Safety Razor" because you couldn't slice all the way through to your windpipe in a single stroke.I learned how to shave with one. I still have a scar under my chin , which luckily is not too visible. I gave up using one because I could no longer find decent blades readily. I tried all the multiple blade over hyped razors, which only clog up with soap and hair. I think single edge is best, you can keep them washed out and after all how many times do you need to cut that hair?I currently use single blade dollar general razors, they are cheap and they work. I don't have to worry about five o'clock shadow any more. having a grey beard is a bonus. It wouldn't be too hard to persuade me to go back to the safety razor, If I could find blades that were sharper than the one on my lawn mower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Safety razors and even cut throat razors are having a big resurgence.

Just do a google search for safety razors and you will find many places selling them.

The sharpest blades are meant to be Japanese blades 'Feather', I have a box of them but haven't tried them yet, figured I would learn on the not so sharp blades. I have been using Derby blades and tonight tried a Rockwell blade which I think was a bit sharper, although my technique still isn't.

This website gives a review of some of the more popular brands of blades and there are dozens of brands of safety razors out there now, I purchased the Rockwell 6S as I wanted an all stainless steel razor and it not to be made with cheap labor in Asia which did limit my options. Top choice would be the Japanese Feather AS D2, but it also has a very top shelf price which is why I didn't get it.

https://www.baldingbeards.com/best-safety-razor-blades/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great!  Welcome to the blood letting!  I gave up on the throw aways and cartridges and multiple blades when I retired some years ago and went with electrics.

I gave up on Norelco because their replacement cutters are now junk and probably mostly counterfeit.  All the time fighting that,  I kept remembering the old safety razor and how heavy they were.  It just seemed they SLICED through the whiskers with less effort.

Digging through the display cases I found my grandfathers last Gillette.  It wasn't used much, but gave it a couple turns in the sonic cleaner and it shined like new.  It is a late 70's and poorly made.  Need a new one and haven't decided on a brand.

Wood & Lather brand pre-shave oil, Proraso cream with a badger brush, an alum block and some good after shave balm all makes my day.  As much fun as winding a 100 year old watch.  After a couple months I am still looking forward to it.  Guess it's just another new hobby.

I found Personna blades to be the best.  Sharper and longer lasting than Feather.  My beard is like #30 wire but sparse.  Blades do not last a week as most claim.  At least not in my case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Tmuir said:

 solid stainless steel double edged razor from a Canadian based company that manufactures them in the USA,

Might we know what is the brand?  Have not come across that one.

Edited by nichod
Change notification setting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to straight razor 20 years ago, basically because I found a new old stock one in a fleamarket in Neuchâtel when I was at WOSTEP- and the razor was made in Neuchâtel! So I haven't bought a razor since then, except for other cool old Swiss straights (I have from La Chaux-de-Fonds and Solothurn and a LeCoultre with replaceable blade). What's funny is how what was once considered a super fine hone is now kind of medium, there's some extreme sharpness fans out there. I still use a measly 8000 grit (and it's fine).

I'm sure some loon on one of the razor forums has found a way to pimp safety razor blades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to hear we have atleast one purist. :-)

I think I'll wait until I've mastered the safety razor before I think about moving to a straight razor though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sure you make an investment in the elastoplast, Surgical tape companies and then get to it. I grew up on those things and the size of the cut was always proportional to the importance of the event you were getting ready for. Have plenty of tissue ready or liberal use of the Alum stick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to use Wilkinson Sword blades.Haven't seen them in decades.After they went off the shelves I tried some others,but they were better suited to scraping bugs off the windshield.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pffft you razed sorts I use my dads old Stanley knife. It’s not the neatest shave but meh I don’t need to look pretty......

erm ok that’s a fib Phillips electric I’m too much of a woos to dare use a blade on my delicate skin. I do go over to Turkey now and again and have a proper shave. It’s my treat to meself 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have my dads old Ronson (Rolette ?) razor in the loft somewhere.  It is in a metal case with two removable sides/lids and a substantial single blade with bar guard (about 5cm x 4 cm). The blade fits to a handle in the case and is used to sharpen on a whetstone inlay on a lid on the one side and a strop on the lid the other side of the case.  The blade then fits on an handle for shaving.  It like a mini cut-throat.  Never had the nerve to try it out as it looks lethal!!  My dad gave it up eventually and went to a safety razor with double edged single blade but would only use G****tte platinum blades which were expensive at the time. I use the normal multi-blade cartridge type but always buy branded blades as they seem to be sharper and keep their edge better.  I also use N*v*a gel or foam as this does not seem to clog the blade and gives a good shave.  I only have a light beard so shaving not really a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No razors for me. I have had a beard for over 40 years. Took me about 3 weeks to grow a full beard.  Started out black and its now grey. I do have it trimmed regular, to keep it tidy now I am older which is something I never did. I used to look like a tramp, so I was told and would just laugh.  I used to hate shaving years ago so took the easy way out. My photo was taken a long time ago must be around 30 years when I was teaching I T in Dorchester. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, oldhippy said:

No razors for me. I have had a beard for over 40 years.

Likewise, although I've only been bewhiskered for about the last ten tears. Prior to that, I tried pretty much every shaving method known to mankind, and I must admit, none were particularly satisfactory. Latterly I used an electric razor. Not perfect, but far less faffing around, and a lower capacity for major blood loss.

A good barber's wet shave probably gives the best actual shaving experience, assuming you avoid the almost legendary "blind Jack", who used to "operate" when I was a youth, from an establishment which shall remain nameless, in the suburbs of Glasgow. While he wasn't actually blind, If you sat with your head tilted to one side, you left with a slope in your fringe.  It was always a good idea to count your ears afterwards, just in case. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd grow a beard but have been genetically cursed with a sparse heavy growth.  I did have chin whiskers just after retirement, but it made me look like the old geezer from a really old western movie.

Granddad used a Solingen straight.  I still have it along with the razor strap he used.  I think it was in the early 60's Dad bought him a Gillette for Christmas.  After he tried it (reluctantly according to Grandmother) he never went back.

Double edged blades were as hard to find here as a complete balance for an Elgin 12S at one time.  Imagine my surprise to see them make a comeback!

Now if I can just find that balance...  Oh, it belonged to Granddad also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have grown two beards in my life.

When I got out of the military I grew one because I could.

I looked like an Arab.

When I retired from the NYPD, I grew one because I could

I looked like Santa Claus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 20 years ago I came across my dad's old straight razor, a Sheffield made Taylor's Eye Witness. It was just the blade and dad had relegated it to cutting quill pens for calligraphy. He once told me that he considered one of his greatest achievements to be successfully shaving with it on a moving steam train just after WW2 without any blood loss.

Anyway, I made new scales for it, honed it up and gave it a go, and was mightily impressed. I have since managed to accumulate around 30 of the things along with a couple of vintage strops, and they are regularly used as part of my daily ablutions. However, for speed on workday mornings I use a DE razor. I have 2 of them, a 1950's Gillette Aristocrat, and a 1920's Gillette #77 set open comb (the only 2 piece Gillette ever made), and they get used in equal measure. Using Wilkinson Sword blades they are about the best shave I've ever had after the straight. As for saving money, my entire shaving inventory has been sourced from car boot sales for a total cost of about £40, and that includes 25 unopened packs of NOS Wilkinson Sword blades.

Vintage Gillettes are now very collectible. I have managed to pick up a good half dozen at car boot sales over the last couple of years, never pay more than about £2, clean them up and straight on ebay. The one piece TTO's and adjustables always fetch good money, and mint boxed Aristocrats reliably get well over £100.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done on the car boot finds, I don't I've ever come across a straight razor at any car boot sales or antique stores in Australia.

I think I'm starting to get the hang of my DE razor, tonight I managed to shave nearly as well as I would normally with my cartridge razor.

I'm now going to have to look up the Gillette 77

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the blades available today are from India, Pakistan & China, regardless of the name on them.   Feather is Japanese.  Personna is made in Russia, Israel & the USA.  I use the US made in the blue and white box.

I also retired from the cop business.  Though support personnel, was forced by law to shave daily.  Tortuous 30 years of my life, but now they pay me to stay home.  Hah!

I collect pocket knives and take Granddad's straight razor out of it's box occasionally for a look but shave with it?  I don't think so.

I watched eBay for weeks and finally bought my birth year Gillette.  Non-adjustable and fixed at somewhere between epidermis and bone.  I used it once.  It's in the display case....

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, canthus said:

I have my dads old Ronson (Rolette ?) razor in the loft somewhere.  It is in a metal case with two removable sides/lids and a substantial single blade with bar guard (about 5cm x 4 cm). The blade fits to a handle in the case and is used to sharpen on a whetstone inlay on a lid on the one side and a strop on the lid the other side of the case.  The blade then fits on an handle for shaving.  It like a mini cut-throat.  Never had the nerve to try it out as it looks lethal!!  My dad gave it up eventually and went to a safety razor with double edged single blade but would only use G****tte platinum blades which were expensive at the time. I use the normal multi-blade cartridge type but always buy branded blades as they seem to be sharper and keep their edge better.  I also use N*v*a gel or foam as this does not seem to clog the blade and gives a good shave.  I only have a light beard so shaving not really a problem.

Thinking again I believe my dads old razor was a 'Rolls' not Ronson. Anyone else know this type?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tossed the cartridge razor years ago. I've purchased stainless steel double edge blades from Turkey, Pakistan, India and China. All shave remarkably well and for about .05 cents/blade, I think they're a bargain. I have a bit over 400 blades and I use each one for a full week. I won't be running short anytime soon. I also use a silvertip badger shaving brush, a hand thrown mug and an artisan produced shaving soap. Shaving each morning is a pleasure, not a chore. I've tried a straight razor but can't recommend it. It's an acquired skill and I never quite got it right.

I have several double edge razors on hand. My favorite? A Schick stainless head/plastic handle that is as light as a feather. I liked it so much that I watched fleabay until a second one was offered and I bought it for a spare. What are the cartridge models up to now? Four blade, five? Oy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Greetings folks. I've been working on watches as a hobby for about 20 years now.  I started out on pocket watches and have never cleaned a clock. In fact, I had a great cleaning machine, with the big jars, and a few other clock tools, that I gave away to an aspiring clock guy over at the Tascione site. But I digress... Nearly 20 years ago I bought a Hamilton model 21 ship's chronometer. It's an early one, pre 400 serial number, and is a thing of beauty, as these generally are. Back when I got it, I had a professional service it for me. It was done well, but wasn't cheap. $400-500, IIRC. I used to display it in my living room and run it occasionally just to hear the escapement and marvel it its accuracy. From about 2009 to 2014 it sat in my storage unit, waiting for new digs. In 2014 I wound it up and it took off running. I let it run down and then put it away for a couple of years. When I pulled it out, I discovered that it had a broken balance pivot. While originally I thought someone had knocked it over and wasn't copping to it, but now, after inspecting the upper pivot's wear, I don't think that's the case. After botching the first staff I got trying to replace the hub, I set it aside again for the past couple of years. The way I broke the staff was I overestimated how deep the hollowness went in my hollow punch that I was using to tap it on. It bottomed out in the punch and destroyed the pivot. Now that I'm finally over that disappointment, I decided to give it another go. I bought a staff that already had the hub installed. I may have to polish the lower pivot, as it doesn't seem to want to set in the hole jewel properly. I'm in the process of verifying all of this. I had to tear down the chronometer at least to the point where I could check to see if the broken part of the pivot was impeding the staff from setting properly. The hole jewel is clear. I'm doing the best I can to do it right, and get it running again. I won't be running it, but want it running just in case I should decide to sell it. Otherwise the value drops quite a bit. Since I have it completely torn down now, I might as well clean and oil it. Does anyone have a hot tip on the best cleaning solutions for cleaning these chronometers? I'd like to use something that will cross over and work for my cleaning of watches as well. I have both an ultrasonic and the small L&R mechanical. I have one more fresh batch of cleaner and rinse, petroleum, no-water, formula. Should I use that, or make, or get, something new? Any tips for oil and grease types to get me by? Any suggestions are appreciated. I do have the Manual for the movement. I know that this is risky business, my working on this chrono, but I just can't afford to spend another $500 to get it running. Plus, I heard that if you're going to run these, you've got to spend this $500 or so to service them every few years. That is not going to happen. Feedback, suggestions, warnings, tips, etc., are all welcome. Many thanks. Cheers.  
    • Hello - I have Tag Heuer F1 Chronograph ca1212-ro, which I've had for many, many years.  Recently I noticed a pusher "cap" had come off and was lost, I have sourced an new pusher, and have removed the movement but am at a loss for how to remove the pusher from the case???  The new pusher is not threaded so I'm assuming the old one is not either - assuming the pusher I was sold is correct.  Are the pushers a o-ring press fit, are they "glued" in, how are they removed and reinstalled?  Any help is greatly appreciated!  Thanks - Nick
    • It would just be a video of me poking and prodding for hours I'm afraid. But the basic procedure for me is, move the index right next to the stud holder, and rotate stud so that the hairspring at this point is centered in the index. Then I move the index little by little away from the stud. If at any point as I'm advancing the index I see the hairspring start to deviate from the center of the pins I back the index up and either tighten or widen the curve, checking the curvature by moving the index over the problem spot after every manipulation. I keep doing this until I get to the dog leg and now I have a perfectly formed end curve. Next is to just fiddle with the two bends at the dog leg to get the collet to center on the jewel. Also check constantly that the collet isn't sticking to the cock by tapping on the cock whenever you are checking your work to make sure the hairspring is in its fully relaxed state. I don't have any special techniques really. It's basically just time and patience. Feel free to ask though if you want me to be a little more specific about anything.
    • Now that this project has been completed, I hope that some of you might be inspired to pick up a scroll saw and try out this craft. Its not hard, just tedious and repetitive but you can make some beautiful pieces of art and there are all kinds of patterns out there for everything one could imagine. This clock is not difficult at all, there are clocks that take guys months or even years to make. Cherry tree toys has the most awesome patterns I've come across and Berry basket has some simple yet beautiful stuff, in fact this clock is from a pattern by Cherry tree toys. https://cherrytreetoys.com/scroll-saw-patterns/ https://www.berrybasket.com/
    • I second this approach.  I'll just add heat can also be used to break down the superglue.
×
×
  • Create New...