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Water in case of Omega Seamaster - Valjoux 7750

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Hi all,

 

Six months ago I finally took by hobby to the next level and was able to service my Omega Seamaster Professional, valjoux 7750 based movement.

 

I did invest quite a lot on learning how to service the movement and get the right tools and lubrification, and this went very well. The movement is performing over 300° and with zero beat error.

 

But I did not invest on getting the right tools for case closing and water proof test and, as a result, after washing my watch under the tap a couple of days ago I was surprised a couple of hours later with some humidity inside the crystal.

 

I opened the watch straight away and cleaned some small traces of water on the dial and crystal.

 

Question to the group: given that it seemed to be a very small amount of water which I'm not able to find any traces now, would it be enought to leave the watch outside the case for a couple of days to dry out? Or just get to it and make a full service again?

 

Many thanks 6662df8a8c72ea2c0c56482392c16190.jpge775fd7b72b4491195fdf90213e247a3.jpgcfb9ef1c6bcfd7b9a0026ffd3b1b4eab.jpg

 

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

 

 

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It's an Omega with a chronometer grade 7750. There's no damage to the dial, so you're very lucky you caught the moisture and opened it in time. I strongly suggest you take it apart and service again to avoid possible rust, heartache, pain, and $$$ later on.

J

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53 minutes ago, noirrac1j said:

It's an Omega with a chronometer grade 7750. There's no damage to the dial, so you're very lucky you caught the moisture and opened it in time. I strongly suggest you take it apart and service again to avoid possible rust, heartache, pain, and $$$ later on.

J

I agree with J,  furthure, I place the backside of the dial under direct sunlight ( under cover) for a day, dial shows no sign of moisture damage Now, moisture penetrates through pores in the paint, flakes appear much later.  What luminious material is used on hands ?    The sooner you clean the movement the better. 

Shock breakes a part or two, water ruins all.  Regards

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You are lucky it was just tap water. Salt water and you would have been in real trouble. It would be best to clean it again to be on the safe side. Omega’s as you know are expensive so care needs to be taken.  

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TAG HEUER care and caseback seal info.txt

My son had a similar problem with his TagH. I found the attached (copied to txt format) on the TH site. Obviously the amount of condensation is relevant.  I had a similar event with my Omega Seamaster (cal552), I removed the back immediately and left it next to the hot water storage tank for a few hours to warm up and dry out.  I left it on some pieces of cigarette paper (to absorb any damp air) in a large plastic container (to keep out any dirt) and replaced back when fully dry.  Not had any problems, corrosion or otherwise since.

 

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