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GregC

Books about cuckoo clock movements

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So now you guys know the limits of what I know about clocks.Are there any websites about cuckoo clocks or clocks in general. What books would give me a basic knowledge?

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Have a look at dperry428 on you tube. He repairs clocks especially cuckoo clocks. He has his own way which is not the way you would start out but he is knowledgeable and informative. 

Cuckoo clocks are a little complicated in their workings so start out with a time only movement something like a mantle clock of an old wall clock. It’s fascinating pulling them apart, cleaning them up and getting them working again.

with your wood skills it’ll not be long before you’re making clock cases to rehouse them 

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As Squiiffy said look around you tube lots of videos about clock repiar.

I feel that at the moment you should look at ebay and buy a cheap working cuckoo, take off the carving and build your fret work around the body, that way you get a feel for what is required. Have a look how the movement works, what parts you need and cost them, plus labour. Then seach the web to see what other shops are selling for and that will give you an idea, although yours will be fret work and the others will be carved which gives you an edge. 

Then after all that you can make the step into repairing movements as you need a few tools for that and it will take time to get good at it.

Don't buy battery operated cuckoo movements as there is no way you can compeat with the rubbish from China.

Here is a china battery made cuckoo. 

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Europea-Cuckoo-Clock-House-Wall-Antique-Clock-Modern-Art-Vintage-Wood-Home-Decor/183696394018?hash=item2ac5288722:g:3TUAAOSwVRBcGLax

Here is a German made brass movement cuckoo.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/German-Cuckoo-Clock-Black-Forest-8-Day-Mechanical-1885-Replication-8TMT540-9/162021568278?hash=item25b93cef16:g:jAQAAOSwT5tWMLTT

Here is where I work, therefore I know a bit about cuckoo clocks.

https://clocks.com.au/

Hope this helps.

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Sorry I should have read your post in the 'making a leather clock' before I wrote the above, just do this part if it is all a bit to stressful.

" I feel that at the moment you should look at ebay and buy a cheap working cuckoo, take off the carving and build your fret work around the body, that way you get a feel for what is required. Then after all that you can make the step into repairing movements as you need a few tools for that and it will take time to get good at it, however there are plenty of people on here to help.

 

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Thanks for the replies guys, appreciated. I need to learn from the ground up as I only know how to cut wood and what I learnt from Mark's courses. I was watching a vid on youtube recommended by Squiffything and I guess cuckoo clocks look kind of hard for me at this stage so I guess ordinary clocks for now. Also, what specialty tools would I need? I have most of the basic tools handymen have like pliers, adjustable wrench etc. Thanks for any and all replies

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3 hours ago, GregC said:

Also, what specialty tools would I need? I have most of the basic tools handymen have like pliers, adjustable wrench etc.

This is a question that seems to come up a lot.

OH, as a Mod, maybe you could make a PDF or Word.doc with a basic list of what is required when starting out and store it somewhere on the site that can be downloaded by people new to clock repair?

 

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Thanks for the replies guys, appreciated. I need to learn from the ground up as I only know how to cut wood and what I learnt from Mark's courses. I was watching a vid on youtube recommended by Squiffything and I guess cuckoo clocks look kind of hard for me at this stage so I guess ordinary clocks for now. Also, what specialty tools would I need? I have most of the basic tools handymen have like pliers, adjustable wrench etc. Thanks for any and all replies


Personal I've found books by Donald De Carle to be good reference material.


For clocks I have a copy of Practical Clock Repairing which I've found useful. Some may may not agree as it is a little dated but it covers a lot, including tools required, and is readily available both new and second hand for not too many beer vouchers.

Hope you find this useful.

NAD




Sent from my moto g(6) play using Tapatalk

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