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    • By wilding
      Hello there watch fix fans. Here's (I hope) an interesting one for you.
      I have this beautiful small ladies 'Fero Feldmann' Swiss-made watch - it came in a bag of "used and to be repaired" watches.
      From what I can see, the mechanism seems in very good working order. Just a slight shake and it goes and goes. There is no strap, but that is not the issue here.
      The problem is the stem and/or crown. As you can see, there is definitely no crown. But I am wondering about the stem.
      The watch does have its case and edoes have, as you can see, a hole where the stem and/or crown will/should fit in.
      There is something which appears to be some kind of part-stem at the 3 o'clock position.
      Using tweezers I can pull it out and push it back in quite freely. A very small screw on top holds this "stem" in place. I think you can see, in ths second photo, how this "stem" attaches to the rest of the movement.
      Clearly I need to attach a crown. BUT what about a stem? A stem extension? Or one of those crowns which has an extended stem-like attachment which should fix onto this current "stem" in this watch?
      Yes, the watch face is somewhat scratched, and the minute hand is a little bent at the top. You may say it is not worth my while trying to get this fixed. But I just SO MUCH like this little watch and would LOVE to give it life again! It clearly IS still "alive" - though I'm not sure if it is a mechanical wind-up or an automatic. The latter of these seems to be the case - as I said earlier, a little shake and the mechanism goes and goes. PErhaps with a little oil (and lots of encouragement) it can be made good.
      So my main question - what kind of stem/crown to attach and how to do it?
       


    • By examiner
      How to remove this winding stem? I don't know what I should push to remove this winding stem.

    • By Heman
      Hello all,
      I have a watch I would like to fix my self. It's made by TAWATEC, who is no longer in business. It's very similar to a Luminox and used TGS for lume. I will provide information to the best of my ability. 

      Here is a link to some information about it. Here are a few pictures of the watch. 

       


       
      I have had the watch since May of 2011. I had the battery replaced in Feb 2015 by a local shop. Less than a year later, I noticed that after taking a shower there was condensation under the crystal. I pulled the crown and left it sit to air out. After about a week I pushed the crown back in and the watch no longer worked. I wondered what caused it to leak. I then remembered I had to change the date on the watch a few days before condensation had got inside the watch. When I was trying to set the date I noticed that it was difficult to pull the crown out and it was more difficult to turn than usual. My guess was that the gasket/O-ring that is on the stem/crown was messed up and had ripped and water had entered that way. I left the watch sit for a year and used another watch as my daily driver. I'm hoping to get this one up and running again. So I recently decided to see if I could fix the watch myself. 
       
      Here is what I have done and have figured out so far...
      I was able to remove the case back by removing the 4 Phillips screws. Visually inspecting the O-ring that seals the case back, everything looks good. The movement is a Ronda 515. The plastic ring that holds the movement inside the case says Ronda 515 # 6. I was able to remove the crown and stem. Looking towards the inside of the crown there was remnants of the O-ring. After clearing the remnants and putting the crown back in, the crown moves freely. I also found remnants if rubber on the front of the dial. After inspecting the battery, it looks to have leaked its electrolyte What I would like to do first is replace the O-Ring that's on the crown and put a new battery in it. If I then determine that the movement is damaged, I can replace it later. 
      What do I need to do to figure out what size of O-ring I need for the crown? I can take pictures of the crown/stem if needed. I also have analog calipers to use that are in inches.
      Thanks for your time!
       
       
    • By lucasantarella
      Hi All,
      I recently replaced the movement for my Tissot PR50, which was a standard ETA F06.111. I now need to replace the crown as the old stem was broken into the crown and could not be re-used.
      Could someone point me in the right direction in finding a proper replacement crown? I don't know the size or how/where to measure to find a proper crown.
      Thank you!
    • By Wesley881
      Hi all,
      My goodness it's been a while since I've posted and boy have I missed this forum! Feels good to catch up on a few new tales of triumph, trials and tribulations.
      I have a Waltham model 1910, 37 size chronometer that I recently had some help getting a new staff for. Now it's time to find a crown. Problem is, the common car clock case for this movement has a 6.80mm neck, but the weighted case for the ship chronometer has a 7.20mm neck. Any ideas of sourcing something like this short of making one? I'm browsing Cousins at the moment...
      Cheers
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    • Don't forget to clean it off spit with distilled water or isopropanol afterwards though, as it contains quite a lot of bacteria, which may dine out on the varnish in the long term. The bacterial content of human saliva is the main reason I would suggest that you never blow in to a watch, or breath on to a camera lens to "clean" it. Slightly more aggressive is white vinegar, which works on certain stains and marks, but needs careful testing with a tiny amount on an area that is not going to be seen. It may dissolve some types of lacquer. Denatured alcohol works on some stains, but again it also dissolves some finishes, likewise acetone, isopropanol, and other organic solvents.   As has been stated, any action runs the risk of further damage. Even tap water, depending on the mineral content, may leave annoyingly obvious marks when it dries. Less is often more, so work on small areas at a time, use good magnification so you can see the results of your actions close up,  and if you get the slightest hint that the varnish is lifting, or the finish is being damaged, stop before you ruin the whole thing.
    • JDM,   No, does no more pay. VWatchie, no personal experience, that type is a newer one. But it has the Indian look. Frank
    • Yes it should be a tapered screw, it forces the hammer arms apart or lets them come closer together. They are often really tight. Put some oil around the perimeter of the head and coax it in both directions. A little turning usually makes a big adjustment, careful! You may not need to adjust it though, do you have clearance with the minute cam? Also, the jumper spring that brings the hammer in contact with the cams doesn't generally have a lot of power. It needs to be greased and reliably coming into contact with the cams. The hammer faces will need a light coat of grease where they contact the heart cams.
    • With a ring inside the crystal this is an armed tension type. The Sternnkreuz 'G22' catalogue covers these which you can download at http://www.sternkreuz.de/accordion/assets/Sternkreuz_Gesamtkatalog G22.pdf Whilst for the Sternkreuz 'ST'' range Roamer does have some specific citations (p25), for the 'ATC' range you need none are mentioned. Almost certainly therefore you'll be fine with a standard ATC crystal that meets your measurements. The usual advice is to go 0.1 larger than the outside diameter measurement you've taken. This means when you release the crystal, after it has been gently 'squeezed' in the claw removal/fitting tool, it makes a nice tight fit. Since you're using Cousins your best bet is going to therefore be https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/standard-chrome-ringed-glass-atc# and the 30.7mm size.    
    • Is not that difficult really. As Matabog noted, dies threaded M6 are standard. The nice expensive set have their Dia. specified, the Chinese write Rolex just to indicate quality, but we know that true Rolex-specific dies are for the screw-on case-backs ...that's another story. Then on AliX search  "watchmaker dies", 20 pieces nylon are like$8, aluminium quite a bit more. I personally choose based on shipping times, things have improved but China post is still very slow, HK, NL post are OK, 7-10 days. 
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