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    • By Joshua
      Hey, so I have a question. I've got an Invicta dive watch with a NH35A movement here that whenever I unthread the stem and crown as it is unthreading the date starts changing. Once its unthreaded I can change it to the 1, 2 and 3 positions and set and wind it accordingly. How can I fix this and what is causing this? 
       
      Yours truly, Josh
    • By Lorenz
      Hey guys, my name is Lorenz. I am an 18 year old electrical engineering student from Germany. 
      I got this Breitling chronospace a56012.1 from my granddad and I want to repair it.
      Besides a slight clicking noise while turning the crown ( someone please let me know if this is normal ) it works just fine.
      My main problem is that the black color on the Bezel is worn out on some positions and I dont know where to find a paint that holds on the metal nor do I know how to paint it again.
      I have worked with watches already, I disassembled a mechanical movement cleaned and oiled it again so I feel pretty confident in doing this job.
      And I would also like to change out the crystal, does anyone know what size crystal I need for this watch?
      Thanks in regards for any advice.

    • By rduckwor
      Early 60's Elgin 10K Shockmaster. I suppose one of their attempts at water proofing a watch (see the crystal and gasket in the second picture). The question is how to get the crown off (Its wobbly when pulled out to the set position and I am certain it contains a gasket) so I can remove the movement? Dis-assemble the keyless works in place so I can grab the stem and unscrew the crown?? Thanks.


    • By wilding
      Hello there watch fix fans. Here's (I hope) an interesting one for you.
      I have this beautiful small ladies 'Fero Feldmann' Swiss-made watch - it came in a bag of "used and to be repaired" watches.
      From what I can see, the mechanism seems in very good working order. Just a slight shake and it goes and goes. There is no strap, but that is not the issue here.
      The problem is the stem and/or crown. As you can see, there is definitely no crown. But I am wondering about the stem.
      The watch does have its case and edoes have, as you can see, a hole where the stem and/or crown will/should fit in.
      There is something which appears to be some kind of part-stem at the 3 o'clock position.
      Using tweezers I can pull it out and push it back in quite freely. A very small screw on top holds this "stem" in place. I think you can see, in ths second photo, how this "stem" attaches to the rest of the movement.
      Clearly I need to attach a crown. BUT what about a stem? A stem extension? Or one of those crowns which has an extended stem-like attachment which should fix onto this current "stem" in this watch?
      Yes, the watch face is somewhat scratched, and the minute hand is a little bent at the top. You may say it is not worth my while trying to get this fixed. But I just SO MUCH like this little watch and would LOVE to give it life again! It clearly IS still "alive" - though I'm not sure if it is a mechanical wind-up or an automatic. The latter of these seems to be the case - as I said earlier, a little shake and the mechanism goes and goes. PErhaps with a little oil (and lots of encouragement) it can be made good.
      So my main question - what kind of stem/crown to attach and how to do it?
       


    • By examiner
      How to remove this winding stem? I don't know what I should push to remove this winding stem.

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    • Hi William, Welcome to the forum. Have been to Elvis and Dolly parton show at Grand ole opry.  Carried out research work in the Atomic City.    Glad to have you here with us. Best wishes. Joe
    • To find out if the slot is in the right place, get a piece of wood wide enough to take the movement, use a 3/8th inch bolt and cut a slot in the end to take the suspention spring, drill a hole near the top of the wood and attach the bolt with a nut. hook the pendulum onto the suspention spring, attach the movement to the board where the crutch is at about the middle of the slot on the pendulum, if the movement is working? the clock should work, attach the hands and see if it is keeping time, which I doubt as I think the slot is way to low, anyway now you have this set up you can just move the movement UP or down till you find the right place for the slot. You do not need to cut the slot while trying to find the right place,  just drill a hole a 1/16th of an inch wider than the crutch, you may end up with a few holes however when about in the right place then cut the slot an 1/2 inch above and below the hole, you can fill to holes or just buy a new pendulum stick.
    • I have the Hormec hollow grind sharpener, and a roller sharpener for wedge shape, and a large diamond file. I hate the Hormec and hollow ground blades (like them for clocks and other stuff though, PB Swiss make my old Snap-On stuff look like toys). I sharpen regularly with the diamond file. Wedge shape, not too shallow. I recall Hamilton recommending 15 degrees, I do a little more. Been meaning to sell the Hormec but after loaning it out try-before-buy to several folks they lose interest after actually trying hollow ground. I know one watchmaker who uses mostly hollow ground, but has 3 or 4 sets and is always messing with them. It doesn't really matter as long as the screws (and nearby parts) survive unscathed. When doing final assembly of a new watch with flat polished screws, where each screw gets hand polished on tin, I use a nickel (german silver) blade, which needs dressing every 3 or 4 screws.
    • Generally #5 or #4. They are darn near the same.
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