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    • By Lorenz
      Hey guys, my name is Lorenz. I am an 18 year old electrical engineering student from Germany. 
      I got this Breitling chronospace a56012.1 from my granddad and I want to repair it.
      Besides a slight clicking noise while turning the crown ( someone please let me know if this is normal ) it works just fine.
      My main problem is that the black color on the Bezel is worn out on some positions and I dont know where to find a paint that holds on the metal nor do I know how to paint it again.
      I have worked with watches already, I disassembled a mechanical movement cleaned and oiled it again so I feel pretty confident in doing this job.
      And I would also like to change out the crystal, does anyone know what size crystal I need for this watch?
      Thanks in regards for any advice.

    • By rduckwor
      Early 60's Elgin 10K Shockmaster. I suppose one of their attempts at water proofing a watch (see the crystal and gasket in the second picture). The question is how to get the crown off (Its wobbly when pulled out to the set position and I am certain it contains a gasket) so I can remove the movement? Dis-assemble the keyless works in place so I can grab the stem and unscrew the crown?? Thanks.


    • By wilding
      Hello there watch fix fans. Here's (I hope) an interesting one for you.
      I have this beautiful small ladies 'Fero Feldmann' Swiss-made watch - it came in a bag of "used and to be repaired" watches.
      From what I can see, the mechanism seems in very good working order. Just a slight shake and it goes and goes. There is no strap, but that is not the issue here.
      The problem is the stem and/or crown. As you can see, there is definitely no crown. But I am wondering about the stem.
      The watch does have its case and edoes have, as you can see, a hole where the stem and/or crown will/should fit in.
      There is something which appears to be some kind of part-stem at the 3 o'clock position.
      Using tweezers I can pull it out and push it back in quite freely. A very small screw on top holds this "stem" in place. I think you can see, in ths second photo, how this "stem" attaches to the rest of the movement.
      Clearly I need to attach a crown. BUT what about a stem? A stem extension? Or one of those crowns which has an extended stem-like attachment which should fix onto this current "stem" in this watch?
      Yes, the watch face is somewhat scratched, and the minute hand is a little bent at the top. You may say it is not worth my while trying to get this fixed. But I just SO MUCH like this little watch and would LOVE to give it life again! It clearly IS still "alive" - though I'm not sure if it is a mechanical wind-up or an automatic. The latter of these seems to be the case - as I said earlier, a little shake and the mechanism goes and goes. PErhaps with a little oil (and lots of encouragement) it can be made good.
      So my main question - what kind of stem/crown to attach and how to do it?
       


    • By examiner
      How to remove this winding stem? I don't know what I should push to remove this winding stem.

    • By Heman
      Hello all,
      I have a watch I would like to fix my self. It's made by TAWATEC, who is no longer in business. It's very similar to a Luminox and used TGS for lume. I will provide information to the best of my ability. 

      Here is a link to some information about it. Here are a few pictures of the watch. 

       


       
      I have had the watch since May of 2011. I had the battery replaced in Feb 2015 by a local shop. Less than a year later, I noticed that after taking a shower there was condensation under the crystal. I pulled the crown and left it sit to air out. After about a week I pushed the crown back in and the watch no longer worked. I wondered what caused it to leak. I then remembered I had to change the date on the watch a few days before condensation had got inside the watch. When I was trying to set the date I noticed that it was difficult to pull the crown out and it was more difficult to turn than usual. My guess was that the gasket/O-ring that is on the stem/crown was messed up and had ripped and water had entered that way. I left the watch sit for a year and used another watch as my daily driver. I'm hoping to get this one up and running again. So I recently decided to see if I could fix the watch myself. 
       
      Here is what I have done and have figured out so far...
      I was able to remove the case back by removing the 4 Phillips screws. Visually inspecting the O-ring that seals the case back, everything looks good. The movement is a Ronda 515. The plastic ring that holds the movement inside the case says Ronda 515 # 6. I was able to remove the crown and stem. Looking towards the inside of the crown there was remnants of the O-ring. After clearing the remnants and putting the crown back in, the crown moves freely. I also found remnants if rubber on the front of the dial. After inspecting the battery, it looks to have leaked its electrolyte What I would like to do first is replace the O-Ring that's on the crown and put a new battery in it. If I then determine that the movement is damaged, I can replace it later. 
      What do I need to do to figure out what size of O-ring I need for the crown? I can take pictures of the crown/stem if needed. I also have analog calipers to use that are in inches.
      Thanks for your time!
       
       
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    • Well, this months pick.  
    • Very good work. Happy to see all the pics and your project.
    • New to watches, I would venture a guess.  Since it was behaving as expected for a full 8 days, then started to switch the date incorrectly, would imply something broke, or became misaligned, or loose at day 8.  Obviously I haven’t a clue, but it’s fun to speculate! would appreciate and update when you figure it out.
    • A gold plated champagne dialed  "Kudu" joins the club. This 17 jewel Swiss front loader needed a service, a crown and stem to get it running. It also benefited from a complete valet, and a crystal polishing session. Finding and fitting a suitable stem was the most tricky part, since the original had broken off right at the edge of the base plate, so extracting without stripping it down was a non starter, and finding something to match the broken stub in my "pile of random stems" took a fair bit of scratching around and experimenting. It looks a whole lot nicer in real life than it does in my rather badly lit photograph. The strap was borrowed from an HMT Kohinoor which is hopefully going to be the next patient up on the healing bench.
    • Nice to be a part of the group. I lurked around awhile go. Just finished level 2 of Mark’s course. I’ve been a member of the NAWCC for many years, and taken their onsite pocket watch repair course, and repaired many since. I also restore old clocks, both the case and movement. Picture attached is of a recent restore. This clock is an 1894 Ansonia that was ready for the trash pile.  I am also in the midst of building a skeleton clock from brass stock. I use a Sherline lathe and mill to turn the wheels and cut the teeth. It has been many years in the making, but has taken its first ticks this year. looking forward to more learning and more work on watches. Mark has a great and easy style for learning.  I’m almost finished servicing my first automatic watch I ever bought, a Tissot embedded with an ETA 2824-2. The mainspring just arrived.    
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