Jump to content
  • 0
east3rn

replacing crown gasket (hidden type)

Question

Hello! 

I am working on a vintage watch and the crown of the watch is fitted with a hidden type gasket which is 

in terrible condition and needs to be replaced.

However, I found it difficult to pull the gasket out with my tweezers or tooth pick. 

Could anyone recommend an easier way to remove this kind of gasket from the crown??

I forgot to take a photo of the crown so I attached a similar example I found on the web.

 

MESS-2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

You need to work it out with patience, it have degrade to sticky tar. Use a small nail with a bent, sharpened tip. Some heat with a lighter may help. When looking for a replacement on Cousins look under Swiss crowns, not gaskets. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Heat a sharpened tip to glow, choose a point on the gasket, burn all the way down to the metal to gain access underneath the gasket, if if didn,t come out peacefully, burn two points or all the gasket. Do not heat the crown. 

I then soak in chemicals to brush clean the residue.

Best wishes

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Maybe I misunderstood that the gasket was at least partly accessible. If it is not, I think you should first remove the washer covering it, try unscrewing or pulling it gently. If it does not come out whole you may get more aggressive but be cautious in not damaging thread. Final option is fitting a new waterproof crown, generic are not terribly expensive. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
2 hours ago, jdm said:

Maybe I misunderstood that the gasket was at least partly accessible. If it is not, I think you should first remove the washer covering it, try unscrewing or pulling it gently. If it does not come out whole you may get more aggressive but be cautious in not damaging thread. Final option is fitting a new waterproof crown, generic are not terribly expensive. 

I agree, Original crowns normaly had a metal washer convering the gasket. The image posted is one off the net, supposedly like what he is working on.  

Obviously my approach would work either if a metal washer.If so and stubborn, the washer can be pressed in, made loose to remove. 

How about a pic of the actual piece @east3rn

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Similar Content

    • By rduckwor
      Early 60's Elgin 10K Shockmaster. I suppose one of their attempts at water proofing a watch (see the crystal and gasket in the second picture). The question is how to get the crown off (Its wobbly when pulled out to the set position and I am certain it contains a gasket) so I can remove the movement? Dis-assemble the keyless works in place so I can grab the stem and unscrew the crown?? Thanks.


    • By wilding
      Hello there watch fix fans. Here's (I hope) an interesting one for you.
      I have this beautiful small ladies 'Fero Feldmann' Swiss-made watch - it came in a bag of "used and to be repaired" watches.
      From what I can see, the mechanism seems in very good working order. Just a slight shake and it goes and goes. There is no strap, but that is not the issue here.
      The problem is the stem and/or crown. As you can see, there is definitely no crown. But I am wondering about the stem.
      The watch does have its case and edoes have, as you can see, a hole where the stem and/or crown will/should fit in.
      There is something which appears to be some kind of part-stem at the 3 o'clock position.
      Using tweezers I can pull it out and push it back in quite freely. A very small screw on top holds this "stem" in place. I think you can see, in ths second photo, how this "stem" attaches to the rest of the movement.
      Clearly I need to attach a crown. BUT what about a stem? A stem extension? Or one of those crowns which has an extended stem-like attachment which should fix onto this current "stem" in this watch?
      Yes, the watch face is somewhat scratched, and the minute hand is a little bent at the top. You may say it is not worth my while trying to get this fixed. But I just SO MUCH like this little watch and would LOVE to give it life again! It clearly IS still "alive" - though I'm not sure if it is a mechanical wind-up or an automatic. The latter of these seems to be the case - as I said earlier, a little shake and the mechanism goes and goes. PErhaps with a little oil (and lots of encouragement) it can be made good.
      So my main question - what kind of stem/crown to attach and how to do it?
       


    • By examiner
      How to remove this winding stem? I don't know what I should push to remove this winding stem.

    • By Heman
      Hello all,
      I have a watch I would like to fix my self. It's made by TAWATEC, who is no longer in business. It's very similar to a Luminox and used TGS for lume. I will provide information to the best of my ability. 

      Here is a link to some information about it. Here are a few pictures of the watch. 

       


       
      I have had the watch since May of 2011. I had the battery replaced in Feb 2015 by a local shop. Less than a year later, I noticed that after taking a shower there was condensation under the crystal. I pulled the crown and left it sit to air out. After about a week I pushed the crown back in and the watch no longer worked. I wondered what caused it to leak. I then remembered I had to change the date on the watch a few days before condensation had got inside the watch. When I was trying to set the date I noticed that it was difficult to pull the crown out and it was more difficult to turn than usual. My guess was that the gasket/O-ring that is on the stem/crown was messed up and had ripped and water had entered that way. I left the watch sit for a year and used another watch as my daily driver. I'm hoping to get this one up and running again. So I recently decided to see if I could fix the watch myself. 
       
      Here is what I have done and have figured out so far...
      I was able to remove the case back by removing the 4 Phillips screws. Visually inspecting the O-ring that seals the case back, everything looks good. The movement is a Ronda 515. The plastic ring that holds the movement inside the case says Ronda 515 # 6. I was able to remove the crown and stem. Looking towards the inside of the crown there was remnants of the O-ring. After clearing the remnants and putting the crown back in, the crown moves freely. I also found remnants if rubber on the front of the dial. After inspecting the battery, it looks to have leaked its electrolyte What I would like to do first is replace the O-Ring that's on the crown and put a new battery in it. If I then determine that the movement is damaged, I can replace it later. 
      What do I need to do to figure out what size of O-ring I need for the crown? I can take pictures of the crown/stem if needed. I also have analog calipers to use that are in inches.
      Thanks for your time!
       
       
    • By lucasantarella
      Hi All,
      I recently replaced the movement for my Tissot PR50, which was a standard ETA F06.111. I now need to replace the crown as the old stem was broken into the crown and could not be re-used.
      Could someone point me in the right direction in finding a proper replacement crown? I don't know the size or how/where to measure to find a proper crown.
      Thank you!
  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • are we talking about round wylers?  the special crystols are hard to find. there were several colors.     vin
    • I'm going to have to do something. One decent desk lamp and bulbs high up in the ceiling are not enough for me.
    • You are most welcome.
    • Thats  a poser,  what I had fitted to the bench at on time was a four in line which used halogen bulbs the same thing uses LEDs now and fitting that up with some 2by1 and made colapsible so that it folds up. the multiple light array should go some way to removing the shadows as the lights strike at different angles,  if it has a decent base a G clamp will fix it to the table/bench, food for  thought.
    • Yes, something like that might do the job. In many ways similar to the goose neck lamp I’m looking at. If only I knew what I need. The light in the picture I posted is very good (not the small one), it’s the fact that it is slightly in front of me hence the shadows. I can move it right above what I’m working on, but again, there will be shadows elsewhere because my hand and head will get in the way. I’m starting to think that a floor lamp next or close to me will be the best solution, casting the light from opposite direction. A head torch would be perfect but I don’t want to sit there with it on for hours. When I look at Mark’s oiling videos (jewels) it’s so clear, yes it’s a lot more magnified than my 12x loupe but there are no dark areas.
×
×
  • Create New...