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east3rn

replacing crown gasket (hidden type)

Question

Hello! 

I am working on a vintage watch and the crown of the watch is fitted with a hidden type gasket which is 

in terrible condition and needs to be replaced.

However, I found it difficult to pull the gasket out with my tweezers or tooth pick. 

Could anyone recommend an easier way to remove this kind of gasket from the crown??

I forgot to take a photo of the crown so I attached a similar example I found on the web.

 

MESS-2.jpg

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You need to work it out with patience, it have degrade to sticky tar. Use a small nail with a bent, sharpened tip. Some heat with a lighter may help. When looking for a replacement on Cousins look under Swiss crowns, not gaskets. 

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Heat a sharpened tip to glow, choose a point on the gasket, burn all the way down to the metal to gain access underneath the gasket, if if didn,t come out peacefully, burn two points or all the gasket. Do not heat the crown. 

I then soak in chemicals to brush clean the residue.

Best wishes

 

 

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Maybe I misunderstood that the gasket was at least partly accessible. If it is not, I think you should first remove the washer covering it, try unscrewing or pulling it gently. If it does not come out whole you may get more aggressive but be cautious in not damaging thread. Final option is fitting a new waterproof crown, generic are not terribly expensive. 

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2 hours ago, jdm said:

Maybe I misunderstood that the gasket was at least partly accessible. If it is not, I think you should first remove the washer covering it, try unscrewing or pulling it gently. If it does not come out whole you may get more aggressive but be cautious in not damaging thread. Final option is fitting a new waterproof crown, generic are not terribly expensive. 

I agree, Original crowns normaly had a metal washer convering the gasket. The image posted is one off the net, supposedly like what he is working on.  

Obviously my approach would work either if a metal washer.If so and stubborn, the washer can be pressed in, made loose to remove. 

How about a pic of the actual piece @east3rn

 

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