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Hello everyone,

I have also loved watches, both quartz and mechanical. I have recently celebrated a birthday milestone and my wife has treated me to a beautiful Omega triple date. Due to the pins in the bracelet refusing to come out for adjustment it was sent to Swatch in Southampton, this took almost eight weeks and was finally returned looking good.

The one thing that I feel isn't quite right is that the watch is gaining 15 seconds a day, as the watch was apparently serviced at the same time as he bracelet was adjusted I'm not overly impressed with the time keeping of the watch.

This is a 1993 build according to the serial number on the case back and therefore has the 1150 calibre movement, should the watch be keeping better time or should I give it a month for the movement to settle after its service.

Thanks for taking the time to read this,

 

Andy

IMG_20190511_171024.jpg

Edited by Andyastar
Picture of the watch

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I would say it dependes on which quality the movement is based on.
The 1150 was based on the Valjoux 7751 which came in three different grades.

1. Elabore' 
2. Top
3. Chronometre

Depending on which one it is based on the deviation in time differs.

Elaboré
Average daily rate: +/- 7 seconds
Maximum positional variation: 20 seconds
Isochronism between 0 and 24 hours: +/- 15 seconds

Top
Average daily rate: +/- 4 seconds
Maximum positional variation: 15 seconds
Isochronism between 0 and 24 hours: +/- 10 seconds

Chronometre
- adjusted and timed per COSC specification.

All these times are also depending on the position of the watch. 
As a curiousity theese movements based on the 7750 Never came in the Standard version.

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10 minutes ago, HSL said:

I would say it dependes on which quality the movement is based on.
The 1150 was based on the Valjoux 7751 which came in three different grades.

1. Elabore' 
2. Top
3. Chronometre

Depending on which one it is based on the deviation in time differs.

Elaboré
Average daily rate: +/- 7 seconds
Maximum positional variation: 20 seconds
Isochronism between 0 and 24 hours: +/- 15 seconds

Top
Average daily rate: +/- 4 seconds
Maximum positional variation: 15 seconds
Isochronism between 0 and 24 hours: +/- 10 seconds

Chronometre
- adjusted and timed per COSC specification.

All these times are also depending on the position of the watch. 
As a curiousity theese movements based on the 7750 Never came in the Standard version.

Hi HSL, How can we tell different grades apart, or if a 7750 is genuine? I read there probably are up to hundered versions, some fake ones of just slightly inferior quality  to the genuine. Some come with plastic lever, some 5 ball other with 7 in the rotor. 

 

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37 minutes ago, Nucejoe said:

Hi HSL, How can we tell different grades apart, or if a 7750 is genuine? I read there probably are up to hundered versions, some fake ones of just slightly inferior quality  to the genuine. Some come with plastic lever, some 5 ball other with 7 in the rotor. 

Just realized I forgott to say Welcome Andy!

Nucejoe if someone asked me ten years ago how to determine whats fake or not I would have written a couple of rows, these days with for example Sellita making their own versions of a movement they used to do for ETA and the quality Seagull began to produce I would say ... I have no Idea anymore.. The different grades from ETA is easier since they use slightly different components, mainly in the escapement and balance. To make it more obvious for us laymen they usually also decorate the movemnet while the standard and elaborate' always have plain sufaces. Between the Top and chronometer it's the hours they put in to adjust the movement in some more positions, things like that is invisibble for the eye..
And on top of all this we have the different modifications manufacturers gets made or make inhouse.. One just have to have a finger and gut feeling from handling large amounts of watches..

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Getting a mechanical watch within an acceptable time tolerance is not straight forward. Watches run at different rates in different positions. So a watchmaker adjusts in the various positions to get a good average. However not every customer wears a watch the same, ie some take their watch off at night. If a watch is consistently, say 17 secs slow per day this can be adjusted. I read somewhere if a watch is consistently running fast what sometimes works is if the watch is removed at night and laid dial down this compensates for the gains during the day. 

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