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Difference between AM and MM Tweezers?

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Hi guys. Recently I've invested in Dumont tweezers, the #2, #3 and #5 from the "Dumostar series" and the #2 and #1 from the "Hi-Tech economy series", but now I'm looking into getting some quality brass tweezers as well. 

 

I was looking through Horotec's line of brass tweezers but noticed that there were two types, the "AM" and "MM". I couldn't find information online about the difference between the two and which  job each type was purposed for. Could anyone explain the differences between "AM" and "MM" brass tweezers? Thank you! 

 

 

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Yes, they are different shapes. MM is more broad, my AM is like #3.

Quote

MM are Non-magnetic. AM are Anti magnetic.

Nice, but wrong. I did not yet hear of magnetic brass.
And what is that:

MM.jpg.3795eb529d0d55ac982a4adf2928f04b.jpg

Frank

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If you look at the Guide to Watchmakers Tweezers on Esslinger they show as a style and show these marks on many different styles of tweezers.

https://blog.esslinger.com/guide-to-watchmakers-tweezers/

Now I am confused, so I went to a source and ask the question on what the MM and AM markings mean from Dumont Tools. I will post the reply when it comes in.

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On 5/10/2019 at 4:48 AM, oldhippy said:

MM are Non-magnetic. AM are Anti magnetic.

I could not find information regarding non-magnetic vs anti-magnetic. However, since the tweezers are made of brass, I had assumed they would not be magnetic at all. Which left me wondering with the question in the original post. 

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20 hours ago, Charlie925 said:

If you look at the Guide to Watchmakers Tweezers on Esslinger they show as a style and show these marks on many different styles of tweezers.

https://blog.esslinger.com/guide-to-watchmakers-tweezers/

Now I am confused, so I went to a source and ask the question on what the MM and AM markings mean from Dumont Tools. I will post the reply when it comes in.

Same! I was reading all over horotec for some type of distinction between MM and AM, but there was no actual explanation. Hope to hear from what Dumont has to say about it. 

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Ok, this is what I got from Dumont:

************************

Hi,

Many thanks for your email. The AM or MM on the twezeers are the type of tweezers as you can see on our PDF brochures attached.

This is not meaning no magnetic or magnetic !!! 

Tweezers AM that we produce are BRASS tweezers with a gold cover of 3 microns .

 Feel free to contact me if you have other questions.

Thanks to work with our tweezers.

Our family factory has 5 generations ( same family--- my husband was a Dumont son. ).

 Kind regards,

 Nicole Sgobero
Vice President 

*************************************

Now granted this is just one company. I am sure each one has different meanings for the "AM" and "MM" markings.

Edited by Charlie925
added notes.

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2 hours ago, Charlie925 said:

If anyone would like the .pdf's she sent me. Send me a pm with an email address. they are quite large.

You can also attach them to a posting, no problem with that.

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