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    • Hi William, Welcome to the forum. Have been to Elvis and Dolly parton show at Grand ole opry.  Carried out research work in the Atomic City.    Glad to have you here with us. Best wishes. Joe
    • To find out if the slot is in the right place, get a piece of wood wide enough to take the movement, use a 3/8th inch bolt and cut a slot in the end to take the suspention spring, drill a hole near the top of the wood and attach the bolt with a nut. hook the pendulum onto the suspention spring, attach the movement to the board where the crutch is at about the middle of the slot on the pendulum, if the movement is working? the clock should work, attach the hands and see if it is keeping time, which I doubt as I think the slot is way to low, anyway now you have this set up you can just move the movement UP or down till you find the right place for the slot. You do not need to cut the slot while trying to find the right place,  just drill a hole a 1/16th of an inch wider than the crutch, you may end up with a few holes however when about in the right place then cut the slot an 1/2 inch above and below the hole, you can fill to holes or just buy a new pendulum stick.
    • I have the Hormec hollow grind sharpener, and a roller sharpener for wedge shape, and a large diamond file. I hate the Hormec and hollow ground blades (like them for clocks and other stuff though, PB Swiss make my old Snap-On stuff look like toys). I sharpen regularly with the diamond file. Wedge shape, not too shallow. I recall Hamilton recommending 15 degrees, I do a little more. Been meaning to sell the Hormec but after loaning it out try-before-buy to several folks they lose interest after actually trying hollow ground. I know one watchmaker who uses mostly hollow ground, but has 3 or 4 sets and is always messing with them. It doesn't really matter as long as the screws (and nearby parts) survive unscathed. When doing final assembly of a new watch with flat polished screws, where each screw gets hand polished on tin, I use a nickel (german silver) blade, which needs dressing every 3 or 4 screws.
    • Generally #5 or #4. They are darn near the same.
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