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jdrichard

Help Putting collet on hairspring

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If a new spring, set the collet on top and see how much (if any) inner spring you need to remove. Ideal would be the collet just fits in the coils plus a little play. Now form the bit that will go in the collet.

 

Slide the collet on a smoothing broach. Get the bit of spring in the hole, then in goes the taper pin. Be sure the pin is on the same side of the spring! Level the exiting part, seat the pin. Now trim it with very fine nippers. With a small fine file (6 or 8 cut), with the side honed smooth, trim the pin and fully seat the pin, then retrimming the exit side. It will look horrible until you trim the pin, but if you eyeball level the 90something degreed from the pinned point it'll look pretty good after trimming.

 

Now you need to level and true in the round properly. It's fine work.

 

It's handy to have a tweezer with one end shortened for fully seating the pin.

 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, jdrichard said:

 

I need to know the best method of putting a collet on a hairsprings...tools and techniques. Before I jump out the window.

 

 

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To bad you can't read Swedísh? Or can you? Have a very good book in the subject. It's call spiral and balances.  Tell you  everything you need to know. I can take some pictures and see if i can translate . Don't think the book is translated either.  DSC00131.thumb.JPG.4b36ab61d371b019a9f96adb5c0b5f60.JPGDSC00130.thumb.JPG.6be278ed90f78f2449db1132b7ee072a.JPGDSC00129.thumb.JPG.8e2fa5c404d699b4572d61fec8f3a42c.JPGDSC00128.thumb.JPG.be444efcea92f740cc440c74ec6ac5d4.JPG

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To bad you can't read Swedísh? Or can you? Have a very good book in the subject. It's call spiral and balances.  Tell you  everything you need to know. I can take some pictures and see if i can translate . Don't think the book is translated either.  DSC00131.thumb.JPG.4b36ab61d371b019a9f96adb5c0b5f60.JPGDSC00130.thumb.JPG.6be278ed90f78f2449db1132b7ee072a.JPGDSC00129.thumb.JPG.8e2fa5c404d699b4572d61fec8f3a42c.JPGDSC00128.thumb.JPG.be444efcea92f740cc440c74ec6ac5d4.JPG

This is very very nice of you. I'll look for The book.


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If a new spring, set the collet on top and see how much (if any) inner spring you need to remove. Ideal would be the collet just fits in the coils plus a little play. Now form the bit that will go in the collet.
 
Slide the collet on a smoothing broach. Get the bit of spring in the hole, then in goes the taper pin. Be sure the pin is on the same side of the spring! Level the exiting part, seat the pin. Now trim it with very fine nippers. With a small fine file (6 or 8 cut), with the side honed smooth, trim the pin and fully seat the pin, then retrimming the exit side. It will look horrible until you trim the pin, but if you eyeball level the 90something degreed from the pinned point it'll look pretty good after trimming.
 
Now you need to level and true in the round properly. It's fine work.
 
It's handy to have a tweezer with one end shortened for fully seating the pin.
 
 
 
 

How do I prevent it from spinning around when it is on the broach? This was an issue. As well the collet will not fit in the smaller diameter of the hairspring with the Bend already established. Perhaps need to cut away a bit of spring.


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You stck it on the broach tight enough that it doesn't spin. Getting the inner end of the hairspring in the hole is kind of like potty training a 2 year old- you just have to coax ot in. The pin is similar. I used to do this on video camera for students 20 years ago and now I got nothing unfortunately.

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4 hours ago, nickelsilver said:

Getting the inner end of the hairspring in the hole is kind of like potty training a 2 year old- you just have to coax it in. 

.. and no doubt just as frustrating (but perhaps less messy) when it doesn't work. :D

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You stck it on the broach tight enough that it doesn't spin. Getting the inner end of the hairspring in the hole is kind of like potty training a 2 year old- you just have to coax ot in. The pin is similar. I used to do this on video camera for students 20 years ago and now I got nothing unfortunately.

Definetly frustrating as heck. I am going to try again today...and stay away from the window.


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Found two tools one can make.4a40572e2db07823ad37894e7b7bfc40.jpg
This one is made from a thick brass rod and tapped for a retaining screw and tapered to ensure the screw does not spread the collet when tightened.
4dabf9865b907f1f9aca53ce705cbdb1.jpg
This one is made from a tapered rod with a second dial used to seat the hairspring and collet. I like the first tool and shall make one.


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2 hours ago, HSL said:

Is that book written by Sven Sandström? You wouldn't have a second copy?

Exactly . I am afraid not . I have pictures that i sent to a friend of every page. But i guess it's hard to read . But send me a PM . Maybe can send it to you on mail. 

Bought it from bokbörsen.se. Maybe someone else has it there? 

Edited by rogart63

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Case closed:)


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Jd the best tool for holding an HS collet is this you can clamp it where you like and you have a good platform for the HS to rest on if you need to manipulate the HS hope this helps Kaz

63972cd1f25f61518228ebfb9f94684b.jpg


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Having done this work more than once,  I suppose this tool is no advantage to the traditional method mentioned by Nickelsilver. By the way, I found fixing the collet to the hairspring is easier than expected.

But making the tool gave you a nice delay before having to start the real task :)

Frank

Edited by praezis

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I have to agree. The hairspring will need to tilt quite a bit when inserting the pin (it looks frightening), like 45 degrees. Anything that impedes that will make pinning 10x harder to impossible. I didn't see an image in a book, will try to get a pic of it.

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Having done this work more than once,  I suppose this tool is no advantage to the traditional method mentioned by Nickelsilver. By the way, I found fixing the collet to the hairspring is easier than expected.
But making the tool gave you a nice delay before having to start the real task 
Frank

The tool should work. And I can tap various size holes for different collet hole diameters.


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OK tried to get a couple of pics, the tiltedness of the hairspring doesn't look so bad but getting the pin in it does need some space to move around up and down. What's important when seating the pin is that the first bit of coil be as level as possible (you can see it a bit in the first pic). Also, as close as you can to true in the round. Once the pin is seated nip off the extra with tweezers like shown. Then seat the rest, nip off the little bit that has come out, and if doing a nice job clean up the exit point with a really fine file.

20190506_131719.jpg

20190506_131929.jpg

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OK tried to get a couple of pics, the tiltedness of the hairspring doesn't look so bad but getting the pin in it does need some space to move around up and down. What's important when seating the pin is that the first bit of coil be as level as possible (you can see it a bit in the first pic). Also, as close as you can to true in the round. Once the pin is seated nip off the extra with tweezers like shown. Then seat the rest, nip off the little bit that has come out, and if doing a nice job clean up the exit point with a really fine file.
20190506_131719.thumb.jpg.f2ba5516693747eb6ae9d96e8c887bba.jpg
20190506_131929.thumb.jpg.71bc4b37dfcf0dbd6061eafe0f7a11cc.jpg

I tried this method a few times and was totally frustrated

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