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Bod

Screwdrivers, what to buy?

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Now I have a problem....

I'm thinking of investing in a set of proper screwdrivers, mainly for clock repairs, rather than watches. (Eye sight not good enough for the really small stuff.)

What sort of price range should I be looking at?

Bergeon, very nice, but outside my price range.

Value, 5 pieces for less than £5, cannot be quality at that price.

Is there a quality, mid range set at a reasonable price?

What should I look for in a quality new screwdriver, tapered tip or parallel, replaceable, or resharpen-able tip?

Thanks

Bod

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A good set from a hardware shop will be fine. If you can try and get hold of some that will hold a slotted screw head in place. Comes in handy for fixing movements back in the case such as mantle strikes and chimes. A few Philips drivers and long handled box spanners come in handy.

Don’t forget good tools will last a lifetime if looked after.

box spanners.jpg

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For clock work the type of screwdrivers are not as important as they are for watches.

I just use a good quality set I bought from a local store years ago that had rotating tops, they are tapered and hardened so I can still sharpen them on a diamond stone if required.

The set of 5 probably cost me the equivalent of £15 to £20, unlike my watch screwdrivers that cost me £80.

Try looking in a local hardware of electronics shop

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Whilst working on a lot of German clocks i have noticed that the screws used on older clocks have narrow deeper slots than those found on modern screws they also tend to be rounded on the heads of the screws modern screw driver blades do not sit well in this type of screw so you will probably have to reshape the tips or if you can buy a set of thin blade screw drivers they sit better in the screw s and will not ride up out of the slot and slip.

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Don't forget the car boot sales and markets, you can find some nice screw drivers that may be old  however made with good steel and most have wooden handles (better for grip). If you see a foot long wooden handled screw driver with a nice thin tip get it as old long case movements have doomed thin slot bolt type that can be a bit stubborn to get out, however the extra length should crack it free. The less the taper on the driver end the better, they will sit better in the screw.

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Thanks for the replies.

I do have a good selection of engineering and woodwork screwdrivers, in most sizes.

It's as wls1971 states, German clock screws.  I have a couple of 400 day clocks with these deep narrow slotted screws, so I fear it will be down to the oil stone for re shaping tips.  I plan to look at the 1/4inch hex bits to see how much altering one of them would need.

Certainly £15-20 range for a watchmakers screwdriver set is well within budget.

 

Bod

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