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Technique question - Working on back side when dial and hands attached

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So I'm working my casing up a naked movement.  Making TONS of mistakes.  Just ordered my THIRD cheap Chinese 2824 clone movement thanks to screw-ups rendering the first two non-functional.

Thank God for cheap Chinese clone movements.

Anyway, my question is this:

When I have the dial and hands attached, I then wind the movement and let it run overnight so that I can make sure that the hands don't rub on each other, or hit the dial's attached indices.  Then I want to turn the movement over, move the click and release mainspring tension, then remove the stem so that I can put the movement in the case.

So I take the movement off of the movement holder (dedicated 11 1/2 linge movement holder, best $15 bucks I ever spent on eBay) and... then what?  Is it safe to put a running movement face down on a case cushion?  If not, then do I just skip releasing he click all together, and let the movement run down for however many hours it takes?  Even with the movement not running, would it THEN be safe to put the movement face down on a cushion with the dial and hands still attached?  Of will I rink damaging the hands/scratching the dial?

Some stuff you just can't learn on your own.  Thank God for the internet.

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No no no! Hands are too much delicate to push on the cushion while working on the back, they can change inclination, bend, scratch dial.

Use a universal movement holder big enough to embrace dial rim BUT take care to not strong or the dial could deform.

Have a nice journey, I know it could be a little bit frustrating but perseverance is the only way to satisfaction!

Inviato dal mio VOG-L29 utilizzando Tapatalk

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What is the purpose of dispowering?  

Disengaged stem can stay in the movement, so long as you hold the stem pointing up, the movement would not fall off.

There is nothing wrong with putting the movement on the palm of your hand( clean glove) face up and lower the case over the movement. 

Regards

 

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I use some a plastic movement holder to rest the movement on when putting it back into the case . As for removing the stem and crown. No need to release the spring tension in the MS .  You can hold the movement in your fingers . But use some gloves or finger cots . https://www.ebay.com/itm/Watch-pocketwatch-movement-case-holders-12-plastic-rings-repairs-watchmaker/192779150533?hash=item2ce28864c5:g:dF4AAOSwQqZcLi6F

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If you’re handy you might be able to replicate this handy tool. Rolex make a “casing up” movement holder. It has a pin to engage the stem release and a bump to grab a notch in the movement so it locks in. You never need to flip the movement or case upside down. Horia make them too: https://www.horia.ch/en/Products/Stem-pusher/Tool-for-removing-stem-for-cal-ETA-2824-2.html

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Wow that's such a cool idea, I'm guessing it would be different for each movement. Even if its the same diameter a Miyota stem release pin is not going to be in the same position as a ETA ???

 

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Wow that's such a cool idea, I'm guessing it would be different for each movement. Even if its the same diameter a Miyota stem release pin is not going to be in the same position as a ETA ???
 


Yes, unfortunately it’s a movement specific solution but I’m a bit of a tool fanatic so I don’t mind a tool for every task (within reason)

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4 minutes ago, Narcissus said:

Yes, unfortunately it’s a movement specific solution but I’m a bit of a tool fanatic so I don’t mind a tool for every task (within reason)

agreed and an excuse to make more stuff with my 3D Printer ;-)

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